Now Playing
Magic 105.3
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
Magic 105.3
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music

national

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >

Georgia restaurant owner accused of assaulting employee over wrong order

Attorneys for a former Gwinnett County, Georgia, restaurant employee said their client was fired after a video posted on Facebook appeared to show the owner assaulting her after a customer complained about an incorrect order.

>> Read more trending news 

At a news conference Wednesday afternoon, Ju’Nea Turner said she suffered bruises on her breast during the alleged assault. which was captured by a customer’s cellphone.

Turner and her attorneys, Muwali Davis and Kayla Bumpus, have now filed a warrant application, allowing her to seek assault and battery charges against the owner, listed on the restaurant’s website as Mr. Lee.

A hearing is scheduled for June 13. 

The viral video, which has been online since the incident occurred on Friday, shows the former Doo’s Seafood and Deli employee yelling at Lee after he accused her of incorrectly filling an order. The owner said the customer’s refund would be taken out of her paycheck, Turner’s attorneys allege. The customer claimed in the video that Lee’s wife placed the incorrect order. 

“I was just trying to make sure I wasn’t financially punished for someone else’s mistakes,” Turner said at the news conference. 

WARNING: Video contains explicit language

Seconds into the cellphone video, the owner appears to knock food out of Turner’s hand and shove her in front of the complaining customer, the employees and the other customers inside the Snellville business.

The cellphone camera was not pointed at the employee or the owner when the physical contact occurred. 

Surveillance footage from a different angle shows that the owner grabbed the food tray from Turner and then pushed against her left shoulder.

“What happened to her was something that no one should have to endure, particularly a woman and a mother who just came to work, and that was her only intent,” Davis said at the news conference. 

Turner said she refrained from retaliating since she has a 2-year-old and a 7-year-old to feed. 

“It’s unfortunate on the day of the incident that the offender was not arrested immediately,” Davis said. “And I’m certain that, if the roles were reversed, that she would have been taken out in handcuffs. For us, this is a matter of both class and race.” 

Gwinnett County police responded to the scene but said the “parties involved in the dispute did not wish to pursue the case further,” Cpl. Wilbert Rundles told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Rumbles said Lee did not suffer any injuries during the assault. 

“The officers explained to each party how to request a warrant hearing from a judge, which is a common resolution and procedure in this type of case, if they changed their minds on the case,” Rumbles said. “Both parties were accepting of the officers’ handling of the call and the call was closed.” 

Davis said this was the first physical incident between his client and Lee, but said Turner has witnessed Lee assaulting other employees. Davis has encouraged other witnesses to come forward concerning Friday’s incident and any other alleged assaults. 

“We believe that this is a pattern and our intention is to stop that pattern,” he said. 

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution tried to contact Lee for comment Wednesday afternoon, but was unsuccessful.

Stay away from dangerous sunscreen pills, FDA warns

The Food and Drug Administration issued warnings Tuesday addressing dietary supplements that claim to protect the public from sun damage.

>> Read more trending news 

“There’s no pill or capsule that can replace your sunscreen,” the agency wrote. “We’ve found products purporting to provide protection from the sun that aren’t delivering the advertised benefits. Instead they’re misleading consumers, and putting people at risk.”

The warning letters were aimed at four companies and accused them of “illegally marketing pills and capsules labeled as dietary supplements that make unproven drug claims about protecting consumers from the harms that come from sun exposure without meeting the FDA’s standards for safety and effectiveness.”

>> Related: Mom warns other parents after baby burned by sunscreen 

The FDA specifically called out the following products for putting people at risk:

The agency said the companies need to reverse any federal violations associated with their products.

A representative with Napa Valley Bioscience told Time in a statement that their product “is made with ingredients that published clinical studies show protect skin from damage,” and is useful for supplemental protection and for users with sensitive skin.

>> Related: How to pick the right sunscreen — and which ones to avoid 

“However, to be abundantly clear: the sun is dangerous, and UV rays damage your skin. We don’t market Sunsafe Rx as a sunscreen, and we certainly don’t tell consumers that they don’t need any other protection from the sun or that they don’t also need to use a topical sunscreen,” the company said. “Everyone should exercise caution when exposed to the sun.”

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, according to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And one in five Americans are at risk of developing the condition in their lifetime.

>> Related: 6 mistakes people commonly make when applying sunscreen 

The FDA is also researching the effectiveness of current sunscreens on the market as some research has purported some ingredients popular in conventional sunscreens may seep through the skin, though human harm due to this hasn’t been concluded.

Scientists discover opioids in Seattle’s Puget Sound mussels

The opioid epidemic has now made its way into marine life in Washington’s Puget Sound. Scientists who track pollution have for the first time, discovered traces of oxycodone in mussels.

>> Read more trending news 

But scientists say those mussels don’t end up on your plate. 

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, or WDFW, gets clean mussels from Penn Cove on Whidby Island and puts them into areas they want to test for water contamination – like in urban waters.

And they’ve discovered there’s enough oxycodone in Elliot Bay for mussels to test positive. 

“What we eat and what we excrete goes into the Puget Sound,” said Jennifer Lanksbury, a biologist at the WDFW. 

Scientists deposit mussels in cages in 18 locations. They teamed up with the Puget Sound Institute to analyze the data and discovered that three locations were positive for trace amounts of oxycodone - two near Bremerton’s shipyard and Elliot Bay near Harbor Island.

“It’s telling me there's a lot of people taking oxycodone in the Puget Sound area. The contamination is likely coming from wastewater treatment plants,” Lanksbury said. 

>> Trending: Sunken treasure worth $17 billion on 300-year-old shipwreck discovered off Colombian coast

After people consume oxycodone, some of it ends up in the toilet, and it goes into wastewater. The water gets filtered, but King County Wastewater Management said although their system can catch a lot of contaminants, it can't specifically filter out drugs. 

>> Trending: Great Pacific Garbage Patch 16 times larger than estimates: 87,000 tons of plastic and growing

And opioids, antibiotics, drugs for depression - mussels are testing positive for all of it

“Those are definitely chemicals that are out there in the nearshore waters and they may be having an impact on the fish and shellfish that live there,” Lanksbury said.

Again, Lanksbury says people have nothing to worry about when it comes to eating mussels from a restaurant or shop because they come from clean locations.

“They’re clean and healthy and delicious. We love to eat mussels from the Puget Sound. We use them for our food and we use them for contaminant analysis,” Lanksbury said. 

But the study shows it’s another sign of what's ending up in the water and harming marine life. 

“People should be wary,” Lanksbury said. “Hopefully our data shows what’s out there and can get the process started for cleaning up our waters.” 

>> Trending: Your bottled water is probably contaminated with tiny plastic particles, health experts say

This was a one-time study for prescription drugs, but Fish and Wildlife officials will seek more funding to continue testing and tracking what happening to in the water over time. 

What is the UV Index and how to protect your skin from sun’s fierce rays

During the spring and summer months you may often hear meteorologists talking about the strength of the UV index

>> Read more trending news 

The UV index is a scale used to measure the strength of the sun's UV rays and how it could have an impact on the average person. The higher the UV index, the more likely someone could develop a sunburn.

Here are a few ways to protect yourself:

--Limit sun exposure during the hours of 10am -4pm

--If outdoors, seek shade and wear protective clothing, hats and sunglasses

>> Related: The 14 most dangerous sunscreens for kids, according to experts

--Apply sunblock of SPF 30+ every two hours, even on cloudy days and after swimming

--Watch out for bright surfaces, like sand and water, which reflect UV and can increase exposure

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, there is something called the "shadow rule" that can help detect how much UV exposure you may be getting. If your shadow is taller than you are (early morning and late afternoon), your UV exposure is likely lower. If your shadow is shorter than you are (around midday), you are being exposed to higher levels of UV radiation. 

>> Trending: CDC warns pools, hot tubs, water parks are hotbed for disease outbreaks

Black driver pulled over, handcuffed by white cops over ‘vegetation’ on his car

An African-American driver in Winfield, Kansas, was pulled over by two white police officers May 13 for “vegetation stuff” on his car window, according to a Facebook Live video posted by driver Rudy Samuel.

>> Read more trending news 

Samuel started recording the traffic stop soon after it happened, when one of the officers first told Samuel he was pulled over for failing to signal.

"Officer says I failed to put my signal light on within a hundred feet," Samuel said in the recording.

"And it wasn't a hundred feet, but whatever."

>> Related: Facebook video captures aftermath of officer-involved shooting of Philando Castile

Samuel handed over his valid driver’s license and registration and the officer returned to the squad car, but when he came back, he gave a different reason for pulling Samuel over.

"Hey Mr. Samuel, what caught my attention was this vegetation stuff right here," the officer said as he pulled something from the outside of the car.

Samuel indicated the vegetation was probably from a tree and said he doesn’t smoke.

The officer asked Samuel to get out of the car so police could search it. When Samuel refused, they pulled him out, handcuffed him and searched the vehicle anyway. They didn’t find anything and eventually let him go with two verbal warnings.

>>Trending: New York gang member found guilty of Atlanta student’s murder

Samuel believes the incident was racially motivated, a spokesman for the driver told CNN.

Peter Wright is with the grassroots group Freedom 1 Organization, which says it looks for fair ways to solve complaints against police and other companies, CNN reported.

"He kept saying 'test it.' They snatched him out of the car, handcuffed him and banged him around a little bit," Wright told CNN.

>> Related: CDC researcher Timothy Cunningham’s death ruled a suicide by drowning

The police chief of Winfield, Brett Stone, also told CNN the incident is “under review.”

George Zimmerman, unemployed, $2.5M in debt, gets public defender in latest legal battle

A judge in Seminole County, Florida, has granted George Zimmerman a public defender to represent him in his latest legal battle.

>> Read more trending news

Zimmerman told the judge that he’s indigent, unemployed and has $2.5 million in debt and liabilities, according to court documents.

Zimmerman is facing a misdemeanor stalking charge that was filed by the Seminole County State Attorney’s Office earlier this month.

A sheriff's report said an investigator, Dennis Warren, contacted Zimmerman in September on behalf of Michael Gasparro, who is making a documentary on Trayvon Martin. The series is being produced by rapper Jay-Z.

Zimmerman allegedly told Gasparro, "Help Dennis out and give him a heads up. I'm going to find him. And I'm bringing hell with me."

He allegedly texted Gasparro and said, "Dennis is a (expletive) who bothered my uncle in his home. Local or former law officer, he's well on his way to the inside of a gator as well. 10-4?"

WFTV legal analyst Bill Sheaffer said the indigent applications are rarely scrutinized by the court because they are done under oath.

“As long as you can show your liabilities outweigh your assets, you are maybe entitled to a public defender and you are maybe entitled to the cost of defense,” Sheaffer said.

Zimmerman is scheduled to be in court May 30.

Zimmerman was acquitted in 2013 of the 2012 shooting death of Martin, an unarmed teenager. of unarmed teen, Trayvon Martin.

Maker of Sweethearts candy message hearts, Necco Wafers sold for $18.83 million

The bankrupt maker of Necco Wafers, Sweethearts conversation hearts and other beloved American candies has a new owner.

>> Read more trending news 

The Ohio-based Spangler Candy Co. offered the winning bid of $18.83 million for the iconic New England Confectionery Co., the country’s oldest continuously operating candy company, at a federal bankruptcy auction in Boston Wednesday.

The acquisition ensures at least a short-term future for the candy maker better known as Necco.

Spangler Candy Co. and three other bidders all indicated they would keep Necco operating at its current location in Revere, just north of Boston, at least through the fall.

Spangler Candy Co. makes Dum Dums lollipops.

Interest in Necco has focused on its "sugar line" of chalky wafers and candy hearts. The fate of its chocolate Sky Bar and Clark bar remains unclear.

>> Related: 6 big name retailers who filed for bankruptcy in 2017

Necco filed for federal bankruptcy protection last month.

40,000 pounds of chicken feathers blocks freeway in Washington

Drowsy driving may have caused the driver of a semitrailer to hit a guardrail and roll his truck, dumping 40,000 pounds of chicken feathers onto Interstate 5 in Federal Way, Washington and causing a backup that stretched for miles.

Photos: Semi crash spills chicken feathers across I-5 (KIRO-TV)

The crash happened on northbound I-5 around 3:30 a.m. Wednesday. 

>> Read more trending news

Initially, four lanes were closed by the crash. All lanes were back open more than four hours later. At the height of the commute, traffic was backed up 17 miles. 

Washington State Department of Transportation crews had a big mess to clean up. Heavy equipment was brought in to scoop up mounds of feathers, which were heading to Canada for agricultural use, but some of the mess had to be cleaned up by hand.

Nine hours later, crews were still cleaning up feathers in the I-5 median.

There was also the matter of the rolled over semi. A heavy-duty tow truck had to be brought in to bring the crashed rig upright again and then tow it from the scene.

Guardrail repairs were also needed.

The driver did not hit any other vehicles and was not hurt, but the Washington State Patrol said he told troopers he felt drowsy before the crash. He also said he woke up when he hit the guardrail.

The driver is facing a negligent driving citation, but WSP says if someone had been hurt or killed in the crash, he would have faced a vehicular homicide or assault charge. 

The driver, his employer -- West Coast Reduction Ltd., out of Vancouver, B.C. -- or its insurance company will be billed for the guardrail damage and tow services, a trooper said.

FDA warns some teething medicines are unsafe for babies

Federal health officials are warning parents to stop using over-the-counter teething products that contain the drug benzocaine, because it can cause rare but deadly side effects in children, especially those under two years old.

>> Read more trending news 

The FDA also sent letters to drug manufacturers Wednesday, asking them to stop selling the teething products.

According to the FDA, children who take medicine containing benzocaine are at a greater risk of developing methemoglobinemia, a serious condition that can cut off the amount of oxygen reaching the blood stream.

Symptoms include pale, grey or blue colored skin, light-headedness, shortness of breathing, fatigue and rapid heart rate.

Benzocaine-induced methemoglobinemia can be deadly if not treated properly, according to the FDA. And, more importantly, the FDA warns that it can fatal after only one use. 

Benzocaine is found in popular brands like Orajel and Anbesol, which are used to treat mouth sores in adults, CNN reports

New York gang member found guilty of Atlanta student’s murder

A New York gang member will serve a life sentence for the 2016 murder of a Clark Atlanta University student.

>> Read more trending news 

A Fulton County jury convicted Devin Kingdom, 24, of murder in the shooting death of 25-year-old Cierra Ford. Ford, a communications major at Clark Atlanta, was shot in the head when several accused gang members broke into her boyfriend’s Sandy Springs apartment in November 2016.

Ford was a California native who wanted to be a journalist. She was a good student and an inspiration to other young women, her brother said.  

“Cierra was intelligent, charismatic, and she had a vibrant sense of humor that resonated with her friends and family,” Clarence Ford said.

Her boyfriend, Tyrique Lobban, was shot three times and injured. Lobban was a leader of the same New York Gang, prosecutors said, and the men intended to kill him to remove him from his position.

Three accused gang members were arrested following Ford’s death and a fourth, Gregory Battle, is still on the run. Initially, police believed robbery was a motive. Kingdom was the first to be convicted.

>> Related: Clark Atlanta student killed in shooting outside condo

Malik Ortiz also stood trial last week and was acquitted of the homicide. The jury was unable to reach verdicts on the remaining 12 counts, according to the Fulton County District Attorney’s office. 

Joseph Clarke, another murder suspect, is still awaiting trial.

Prosecutors said the trouble started two years after the New York gang members relocated to Atlanta in 2014. They lived with Lobban in his apartment until infighting resulted in a leadership struggle.

“The dispute between Lobban and the other four men came to a head in October of 2016 when Lobban asked Clarke, Ortiz, and Battle to move out of the apartment,” said Chris Hopper, the spokesman for Fulton County District Attorney Paul Howard Jr. “Once they moved out of the apartment, the men made a decision to kill Lobban and remove him from his leadership position in the gang.”

In the deadly coup, the four allegedly entered the Sandy Springs apartment through an unlocked door with weapons drawn, the jury heard at trial.

>> Related: 3arrested in Clark Atlanta student’s murder

They first encountered a roommate and another alleged gang member, Jabar Brady. Hopper said the men gave Brady, who was 19 at the time, a chance to live and he left the apartment.

Prosecutors intended for Brady to testify, but he killed himself in New York shortly before the trial, according to the DA’s office. He was considered one of the state’s key witnesses. 

“The gravity of these violent deaths never seems to end,” Howard said of Brady’s death.

Ford and Lobban were shot when the group kicked in the door to Lobban’s upstairs bedroom and found them in bed, prosecutors said. 

>> Trending: 7 young men facing murder charges in Georgia motel shooting

In addition to felony murder, Kingdom was found guilty of first-degree home invasion, aggravated assault, aggravated battery, first-degree burglary and possession of a firearm in the commission of a felony. 

He was sentenced by Superior Court Judge Kimberly M. Esmond Adams to life in prison plus 10 years. 

The jury apparently could not reach a conclusion on Ortiz’s involvement in the crime.

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >