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Britain basks in royal wedding afterglow; grave gets bouquet

Unwilling to kiss Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding goodbye just yet, Britain basked Sunday in the scale of the spectacle as major broadcasters kept scenes from the royal nuptials on repeat along with fresh interviews with the bride's dressmaker.

The newlyweds have not been seen in public since they left Windsor Castle in a rare 1968 Jaguar convertible for a Saturday night reception hosted by the groom's father, Prince Charles.

They were expected to return to their home at Kensington Palace in London on Sunday, but the palace did not provide updates or details. Markle's bridal bouquet was laid at the Grave of the Unknown Warrior at the British capital's Westminster Abbey.

But anyone with a lingering case of royal wedding fever could join the tourists and locals soaking up the romantic mood and continued sunshine in the town of Windsor, where Saturday's wedding and post-service carriage procession were held.

Good wishes poured in from around the world. British singer Adele posted a message on Instagram Sunday along with a photo of herself wearing a veil and toasting with a glass of champagne. She wished the couple well and invoked the memory of Princess Diana, Harry's late mother.

"Congratulations Meghan and Harry," she wrote. "You're the most beautiful bride. I can't stop thinking of how happy Princess Diana is upstairs x."

Kensington Palace did not release details, but photographs showed Markle, now known formally as the Duchess of Sussex, wearing to the evening reception a large, emerald-cut aquamarine ring that Diana wore often before she died in a Paris car crash in 1997.

The wedding was the only topic of the day in Britain's newspapers and on its television networks. The tone of the press coverage was congratulatory, with publications taking pride in the evident British flair for producing memorable events with fantastic settings and split-second precision.

Former British Cabinet minister Peter Mandelson told ITV Sunday that the wedding was so moving that he is now considering proposing marriage to his longtime partner.

"People all over the country are going to feel inspired, they are all going to want to run out and get married now," he said.

The royal family, understandably thrilled by the good weather and good will, expressed gratitude to the visitors and viewers who came to Windsor or tuned in via TV.

"Thank you to everyone who came to Windsor and those who followed from around the UK, the Commonwealth, and the world," the royals said.

After the big day, Queen Elizabeth II returned to her normal routine. She was seen being driven back to Windsor Castle after attending a Sunday morning church service.

The designer of Markle's deceptively simple wedding gown and elaborate veil said Sunday that she received the special commission in early January and managed to keep it secret not only from the inquisitive British press, but from her family.

"It was an extraordinary moment when she told me," said Clare Waight Keller, a Briton who made history as the first female artistic director at French fashion house Givenchy. "Of course, it's an incredible thing to be part of such a historic moment."

She said the design process had been collaborative.

"I think she loved the fact that I was a British designer and working in a house such as Givenchy, which has its roots in a very classical, beautiful style," Waight Keller said.

Hair stylist Serge Norman, who came from New York to do Markle's hair, said she was relaxed in the hours before the ceremony.

"She was calm, yeah," he said. "Chatty, absolutely. We were definitely having exchanges, yeah for sure. She was very happy. It was a beautiful morning, just the perfect morning to get married."

Harry and Markle spent their first night as a married couple at Windsor Castle. They are breaking with tradition by delaying a honeymoon. Before the wedding, Markle said she wanted to take up royal duties immediately.

They plan to fulfill their first royal work engagement as a married couple Tuesday, when they attend a garden party at Buckingham Palace to honor Prince Charles and his charity work. Charles' 70th birthday is later this year.

Palace officials have been vague about Harry and Markle's honeymoon plans, but they are expected to take a honeymoon in the near future.

No destination has been announced, and the couple may choose a place where they can relax without being trailed by photographers. Harry took Markle on a camping trip in Botswana shortly after they met and started dating.

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For complete AP royal wedding coverage, visit https://apnews.com/tag/Royalweddings

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Rikers Island inmates get a taste of ancient Greece

Some inmates at New York City's biggest jail got a taste of ancient Greece this weekend.

A theater company went to Rikers Island on Saturday to perform skits from plays by Sophocles that deal with wounded, traumatized warriors and how they deal with other people off the battleground. It was a perfect fit for the New York audience behind bars — about 20 military veterans living in a new jail unit where even the correction officers are veterans.

Bryan Doerries (DOUGH'-rees), head of the Theater of War company that presented the Greek tragedies, then invited the imprisoned veterans to discuss their personal stories.

The Department of Correction's Senior Deputy Commissioner Timothy Farrell says officials are trying to give these veterans charged with non-violent crimes "a sense of camaraderie."

Working Families Party formally endorses Cynthia Nixon

New York's progressive Working Families Party formally endorsed "Sex and the City" actress Cynthia Nixon on Saturday as its gubernatorial candidate — challenging incumbent Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

The small, progressive party held its annual convention at Harlem's First Corinthian Baptist Church, where the 52-year-old Emmy award-winning activist accepted the nomination.

"After eight years of Andrew Cuomo and with Donald Trump in the White House, I cannot imagine not running," Nixon said.

Also formally endorsed was New York City Council member Jumaane Williams for lieutenant governor.

In an unusual move, the party's state committee voted to back two hopefuls for attorney general: New York City Public Advocate Letitia James, whom Cuomo supports, and law professor Zephyr Teachout.

"There are two incredible progressive women in the race and New Yorkers would be lucky to have either as attorney general," said Bill Lipton, director of the New York Working Families Party, which he said gave James and Teachout their start running for office.

Teachout, a professor at Fordham University, ran against Cuomo for the Democratic nomination for governor in 2014, winning 34 percent of the vote to his 62 percent.

"Gov. Cuomo would like nothing more than to have progressives fighting each other," Lipton told The Associated Press. "But we're committed to staying united."

Nixon, who has never run for office, will face Cuomo in the Democratic gubernatorial primary on Sept. 13.

If she loses, her name could still appear on the Working Families Party ballot line in the November general election. She has not said whether she would opt for that.

Polls show the two-time incumbent governor with a commanding lead over the novice candidate. A Quinnipiac University poll released May 2 found 50 percent of registered Democratic voters favor Cuomo compared to 28 percent for Nixon. The poll of 1,076 New York state voters conducted April 26 to May 1 has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.7 percentage points.

The party first announced in April that it would embrace Cuomo's challenger over the governor.

Cuomo said he would not seek the backing of the party that had endorsed him in the past. Instead, the governor has gained the support of two major unions that pulled out of the Working Families Party over its support for Nixon.

The party was first organized in 1998 by a coalition of labor unions, plus a variety of community and advocacy groups aiming to represent middle- and working-class New Yorkers.

Abbey Fashouer, a spokeswoman for Cuomo's re-election campaign, has said the governor's progressive record is "unmatched," including helping to raise New York's minimum wage, and pushing for gun-safety legislation and the legalization of same-sex marriage.

Filmmaker Luc Besson targeted in Paris rape complaint

French authorities said Saturday they are investigating a rape accusation against "Valerian" filmmaker Luc Besson, who denies wrongdoing.

A judicial official told The Associated Press that a 27-year-old woman filed a complaint Friday accusing the 59-year-old director of drugging and penetrating her at the hotel Bristol in Paris.

The official was not authorized to be publicly named.

BFM television and Europe-1 radio cite Besson's lawyer as saying he denies the accusations. His attorneys did not return messages from the AP.

The reports came as the Cannes Film Festival is wrapping up; accusations of sexual misconduct and inequality in the movie industry have been prominent themes at the festival this year.

Besson has produced nearly 100 films and written and directed many of them. His films include the "Taken" series, "The Fifth Element" and "Leon." His Europa Corp. production company didn't respond to requests for comment.

Reggie Lucas, who worked with Miles Davis and Madonna, dies

Reggie Lucas, the Grammy-winning musician who played with Miles Davis in the 1970s and produced the bulk of Madonna's debut album, has died. He was 65.

The performer's daughter, Lisa Lucas, told The Associated Press that her father died from complications with his heart early Saturday in New York City.

"After a long and arduous struggle with his physical heart (his emotional one was perfect) he was called home. I wish he'd had more time, I wish we'd all had more time with him, but he left this world absolutely covered in love, with his hands held and his family beside him. I'm glad he's at peace now," Lisa Lucas wrote on her Facebook page.

Lucas was born on Feb. 25, 1953 in the Queens borough of New York City. After playing with Davis in the 70s, Lucas began a musical partnership with percussionist James Mtume. Together they wrote hits like Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway's "The Closer I Get to You" — later covered by Beyonce and Luther Vandross — and Stephanie Mills' "Never Knew Love Like This Before," which won the duo the Grammy for best R&B song.

Lucas went on to produce the majority of Madonna's 1983 self-titled debut album, which sold more than 5 million units and included the hits "Borderline" and "Lucky Star."

In addition to his daughter, Lucas is survived by his wife Leslie Lucas; his son Julian Lucas; his mother Annie Wolinsky; and his brother Greg Lucas.

Oprah to Idris: Celebrities spice up royal wedding

Oprah Winfrey seemed a tad confused about her seating assignment. Serena Williams documented her journey to St. George's Chapel on Instagram. Idris Elba smiled broadly as he escorted his fiancee, model Sabrina Dhowre, who wore the obligatory hat.

They were among a slew of celebrities among the 600 guests Prince Harry and Meghan Markle invited to their wedding ceremony on Saturday, an event from which politicians were excluded.

Several of Markle's former co-stars on the USA Network paralegal drama "Suits" were invited. Among them were Gina Torres, Sarah Rafferty, Abigail Spencer, Rick Hoffman and Markle's on-screen hubby, Patrick J. Adams. "Pretty Little Liars" star Troian Bellisario, Adams' wife, was his plus-one.

Indian actress Priyanka Chopra, a friend of the bride's, strutted into the chapel in a light heather grey Vivienne Westwood pencil skirt and matching jacket with an asymmetric collar.

Tennis star Williams, accompanied by her husband, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian, chose a blush, long-sleeve silk drape dress by Atelier Versace to go with her fascinator in pale pink, a hue also favored by Winfrey and others for the royal wedding.

Elton John, looking dapper in tails, did double-duty as a wedding guest and a performer at the luncheon reception hosted by Queen Elizabeth II. He sported pink eyeglasses as he arrived with husband David Furnish.

John was a close friend of the groom's late mother, Princess Diana, and played his hit "Candle in the Wind" at her 1997 funeral. Kensington Palace did not disclose which songs he chose for the wedding.

George and Amal Clooney, James Corden and David and Victoria Beckham also watched the nuptials on the grounds of Windsor Castle — Ms. Clooney in a bright yellow Stella McCartney dress and matching hat. It seemed her hubby walked just slowly enough to keep her out of peril in her heels on the castle's menacing cobblestones.

British singer James Blunt was in traditional tails, while Argentine polo player Nacho Figueras went for a double-breasted blue suit. He didn't forget the pocket square.

Actress Carey Mulligan shined in an all-over yellow floral print dress with a high neck and short sleeves from Erden. She was accompanied by husband Marcus Mumford of the Mumford & Sons band.

Joss Stone was also on hand, prompting BBC commenters to note that the singer, often barefoot on stage, wore shoes.

Oprah's longtime partner, Stedman Graham, said he could have joined her, but was happier giving a commencement address inside a gymnasium in Baltimore, where his advice to graduates just might extend to a certain American across the pond: Don't be concerned with how others define you, he said: "The only thing that matters is how you define yourselves."

The Latest: 'Shoplifters' wins Palme d'Or at Cannes

The Latest on the awards ceremony for the 71st Cannes Film Festival being presented Saturday night (all times local):

8:10 p.m.

Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda's "Shoplifters" is the winner of the Palme d'Or award at the Cannes Film Festival.

The film is a tender portrait of a poor, impoverished family.

The director accepted the award in Japanese and dedicated it to the whole production team involved in movie.

Nadine Labaki's "Capernaum" won the festival's Jury Prize. Spike Lee won the Grand Prize for his film "BlacKkKlansman."

___

This item corrects the spelling of director Hirokazu Kore-ada's first name and punctuation on Lee's film "BlacKkKlansman."

___

7:55 p.m.

"Cold War" has won the best director award at the Cannes Film Festival.

The film is Polish director Pawel Pawlikowski's follow-up to his 2013 Oscar-winner "Ida."

It is set during the 1940s and 1950s of Poland's communist rule and tells the story about an ill-fated romance between Wiktor (Tomasz Kot), a composer and pianist, and Zula (Joanna Kulig), a singer. They meet at a newly formed academy dedicated to preserving Polish folk music traditions. They flee the country after nationalistic pressures descend on the school.

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7:50 p.m.

Two films have been awarded the best screenplay award at the Cannes Film Festival — "Happy as Lazzaro" and "3 Faces."

Alice Rohrwacher won for "Happy as Lazzaro," her time-warped fable about a poor farm boy in rural Italy.

Nader Saeivar and Jafar Panahi won for "3 Faces." Panahi was unable to leave his native Iran despite pleas from many to allow him to attend Cannes. Among Panahi's vocal supporters is countryman Asghar Farhadi.

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7:15 p.m.

Cannes jury president Cate Blanchett has arrived at the Cannes awards ceremony in a silk gown with a large red bow on the back.

She told journalists Saturday evening that it had been "a very rich and powerful festival" and the deliberations in the jury had been "amicable."

Blanchett says jurors didn't "judge" the winner but they "chose" it.

The actress is one of the few women to head the jury in the festival's 71 year history. She has been a vocal supporter of the #MeToo movement and used the role as a platform to highlight sexism in the film industry. Other jury members arrived shortly after, including actresses Kristen Stewart and Lea Seydoux.

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7 p.m.

Lebanese director Nadine Labaki is among the first contenders for the Cannes Film Festival's Palme d'Or to hit the red carpet at the Palais des Festivals in a fitted one shoulders gown.

Labaki is considered one of the front runners for the film festival's top prize as her film "Capernaum" received the longest standing ovation of the competition, at 15 minutes.

 Spike Lee also was seen on Saturday night's red carpet, telling journalists that he'd been in New York "yesterday." Lee, a Cannes veteran, said he first came to the festival in 1986. His film "BlackKklansman" debuted at the festival and is due to be released in August.

Organizers often call winning contenders for them to come back and attend the ceremony, leading some to speculate on the potential winners based on who graces the red carpet at the end of the 12 day festival.

___

5 p.m.

The makers of 21 movies are vying to win the Palme d'Or, the Cannes Film Festival's top prize.

The star-studded awards ceremony is taking place Saturday night in the French Riviera city.

Australian actress and campaigner against sexual harassment Cate Blanchett led this year's jury, which also included actress Kristen Stewart.

The May 8-19 festival, the first since the downfall of film mogul Harvey Weinstein over accusations of sexual misconduct by dozens of women, was dominated by the #MeToo movement.

A movie by one of three female directors in the lineup, "Capernaum" by Lebanon's Nadine Labaki, is considered by some a front-runner for the Palme d'Or.

Other favorites include "BlacKkKlansman" by Spike Lee, "Burning" by South Korea's Lee Chang-dong and "The Wild Pear Tree" by Turkey's Nuri Bilge Ceylan.

Love and fire: Text of Michael Curry's royal wedding address

And now in the name of our loving, liberating and life-giving God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Amen.

From the Song of Solomon, in the Bible:

"Set me as a seal upon your heart,

as a seal upon your arm;

for love is strong as death,

passion fierce as the grave.

Its flashes are flashes of fire,

a raging flame.

Many waters cannot quench love,

neither can floods drown it."

The late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr once said, and I quote: "We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we discover that, we will be able to make of this old world a new world, for love is the only way."

There's power in love. Don't underestimate it. Don't even over-sentimentalize it. There's power - power in love. If you don't believe me, think about a time when you first fell in love. The whole world seemed to center around you and your beloved.

Oh there's power - power in love. Not just in its romantic forms, but any form, any shape of love. There's a certain sense in which when you are loved, and you know it, when someone cares for you, and you know it, when you love and you show it - it actually feels right. There's something right about it.

And there's a reason for it. The reason has to do with the source. We were made by a power of love, and our lives were meant - and are meant - to be lived in that love. That's why we are here.

Ultimately, the source of love is God himself: the source of all of our lives.

There's an old medieval poem that says: "Where true love is found, God himself is there".

The New Testament says it this way: "Beloved, let us love one another, because love is of God, and those who love are born of God and know God. Those who do not love do not know God. Why? For God is love."

There's power in love. There's power in love to help and heal when nothing else can.

There's power in love to lift up and liberate when nothing else will. There's power in love to show us the way to live.

"Set me as a seal on your heart, a seal on your arm, for love is as strong as death."

But love is not only about a young couple. Now the power of love is demonstrated by the fact that we're all here. Two young people fell in love, and we all showed up. But it's not just for and about a young couple, who we rejoice with. It's more than that.

Jesus of Nazareth on one occasion was asked by a lawyer to sum up the essence of the teachings of Moses, and he went back and he reached back into the Hebrew scriptures, to Deuteronomy and Leviticus, and Jesus said: "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind and all your strength. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like it: Love your neighbor as yourself."

And then in Matthew's version, he added, he said: "On these two, love of God and love of neighbor, hang all the law, all the prophets, everything that Moses wrote, everything in the holy prophets, everything in the scriptures, everything that God has been trying to tell the world — love God, love your neighbors, and while you're at it, love yourself."

Now, someone once said that Jesus began the most revolutionary movement in all of human history. A movement grounded in the unconditional love of God for the world and a movement mandating people to live that love. And in so doing to change not only their lives but the very life of the world itself.

I'm talking about some power. Real power. Power to change the world. If you don't believe me, well, there were some old slaves in America's Antebellum South who explained the dynamic power of love and why it has the power to transform. They explained it this way. They sang a spiritual, even in the midst of their captivity. It's one that says "There's a balm in Gilead..." a healing balm, something that can make things right.

"There is a balm in Gilead to make the wounded whole.

"There is a balm in Gilead

"To heal the sin sick soul."

And one of the stanzas actually explains why. They said:

"If you cannot preach like Peter,

And you cannot pray like Paul,

You just tell the love of Jesus,

How he died to save us all."

Oh, that's the balm in Gilead! This way of love, it is the way of life. They got it. He died to save us all. He didn't die for anything he could get out of it. Jesus did not get an honorary doctorate for dying. He wasn't getting anything out of it. He gave up his life, he sacrificed his life, for the good of others, for the good of the other, for the wellbeing of the world, for us.

That's what love is. Love is not selfish and self-centered. Love can be sacrificial, and in so doing, becomes redemptive. And that way of unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive love changes lives, and it can change this world.

If you don't believe me, just stop and imagine. Think and imagine a world where love is the way.

Imagine our homes and families where love is the way.

Imagine our neighborhoods and communities where love is the way.

Imagine our governments and nations where love is the way.

Imagine business and commerce where this love is the way.

Imagine this tired old world where love is the way.

When love is the way - unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive.

When love is the way, then no child will go to bed hungry in this world ever again.

When love is the way, we will let justice roll down like a mighty stream and righteousness like an ever-flowing brook.

When love is the way, poverty will become history.

When love is the way, the earth will be a sanctuary.

When love is the way, we will lay down our swords and shields, down by the riverside, to study war no more.

When love is the way, there's plenty good room - plenty good room - for all of God's children. Because when love is the way, we actually treat each other, well... like we are actually family.

When love is the way, we know that God is the source of us all, and we are brothers and sisters, children of God.

My brothers and sisters, that's a new heaven, a new earth, a new world, a new human family.

And let me tell you something, old Solomon was right in the Old Testament: that's fire.

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin - and with this I will sit down, we gotta get y'all married - French Jesuit Pierre Teilhard de Chardin was arguably one of the great minds, great spirits of the 20th century. Jesuit, Roman Catholic priest, scientist, a scholar, a mystic.

In some of his writings, he said, from his scientific background as well as his theological one, in some of his writings he said - as others have - that the discovery, or invention, or harnessing of fire was one of the great scientific and technological discoveries in all of human history.

Fire to a great extent made human civilization possible. Fire made it possible to cook food and to provide sanitary ways of eating, which reduced the spread of disease in its time.

Fire made it possible to heat warm environments and thereby made human migration around the world a possibility, even into colder climates.

Fire made it possible... there was no Bronze Age without fire, no Iron Age without fire, no Industrial Revolution without fire. The advances of fire and technology are greatly dependent on the human ability and capacity to take fire and use it for human good.

Anybody get here in a car today? An automobile? Nod your heads if you did - I know there were some carriages. But those of us who came in cars, fire - controlled, harnessed fire - made that possible.

I know that the Bible says, and I believe it, that Jesus walked on the water. But I have to tell you, I did not walk across the Atlantic Ocean to get here.

Controlled fire in that plane got me here. Fire makes it possible for us to text and tweet and email and Instagram and Facebook and socially be dysfunctional with each other.

Fire made all of that possible, and de Chardin said fire was one of the greatest discoveries in all of human history. And he then went on to say that if humanity ever harnesses the energy of fire again, if humanity ever captures the energy of love - it will be the second time in the history of the world that we have discovered fire.

Dr. King was right: we must discover love - the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will make of this old world, a new world.

My brother, my sister, God love you, God bless you, and may God hold us all in those almighty hands of love.

Read: Episcopal Church’s Michael Curry’s address at royal wedding

The Most Rev. Michael Curry of the Episcopal Church gave the formal address at the royal wedding between Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

Related>>Royal Wedding: Meghan Markle, Prince Harry wed (live updates)

His stirring speech included quotes from civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., American slaves and a Jesuit theologian.

>> Read more trending news

Read the full address, transcribed by The Washington Post:

“The late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once said and I quote: “We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we discover that, we will be able to make of this old world a new world. Love is the only way.”

There’s power in love. Do not underestimate it. Don’t even over sentimentalize it. There’s power, power in love. If you don’t believe me, think about a time when you first fell in love. The whole world seemed to center around you and your beloved. There’s power, power in love, not just in its romantic forms, but any form, any shape of love. There’s a certain sense in which when you are loved and you know it, when someone cares for you and you know it, when you love and you show it. It actually feels right. There’s something right about it. There’s a reason for it. It has to do with the source.

We were made by a power of love. Our lives were meant and are meant to be lived in that love. That’s why we are here. Ultimately the source of love is God himself. The source of all of our lives.

There’s an old medieval poem that says: “Where true love is found, God himself is there.” The New Testament says it this way. “Beloved, let us love one another, because love is of God; And those who love are born of God and know God. Those who not love does not know God. Why? For God is love.”

There’s power in love. There’s power in love to help and heal when nothing else can. There’s power in love to lift up and liberate when nothing else will. There’s power in love to show us the way to live. (…) But love is not only about a young couple. The power of love is demonstrated by the fact that we’re all here. Two young people fell in love, and we all showed up. It’s not just for and about a young couple whom we rejoice with. It’s more than that.

Jesus of Nazareth on one occasion was asked by a lawyer to sum up the essence of the teachings of Moses. He went back and reached back to the Hebrew Scriptures to Deuteronomy and Leviticus, and Jesus said, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your mind and all your strength. This is the first and great commandment. The second is like it: love your neighbor as yourself. Then in Matthew’s version, he added, he said, on these two, love of God and love of neighbor, hang all the law, all the prophets, everything that Moses wrote, everything from the holy prophets, everything in the scriptures, everything that God has been trying to tell the world. Love God, love your neighbors, and while you’re at it, love yourself.

Someone once said that Jesus began the most revolutionary movement in human history: a movement ground on the unconditional love of God for the world and a movement mandating people to live and love.

And in so doing, to change not only their lives but the very life of the world itself! I’m talking about the power, real power, power to change the world.

If you don’t believe me, well, there were some old slaves in America’s Antebellum South, who explained the dynamic power of love and why it has the power to transform. They explained it this way. They sang a spiritual even in the midst of their captivity. It’s one that says there is a balm in Gilead, a healing balm, something that can make things right. There is a balm in Gilead to make the wounded whole. There is a balm in Gilead to heal the sin sick soul. One of the stanzas explains why, it says, if you cannot preach like Peter, you cannot pray like Paul, you just tell the love of Jesus, how he died to save us all. That’s the balm in Gilead. This way of love is the way of life. They got it.

He died to save us all. He didn’t die for anything he could get out of it. Jesus did not get an honorary doctorate for dying. He wasn’t getting anything out of it. He gave up his life, he sacrificed his life for the good of others, for the well being of the world, for us. That’s what love is. Love is selfish or self-centered. Love can be sacrificial, and in so doing, become redemptive. That way of unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive love changes lives. And it can change this world.

Stop and imagine for a minute. Think and imagine. Think and imagine a world where love is the way.

Imagine our homes and families when love is the way. Imagine our neighborhoods and communities where love is the way. Imagine governments and nations where love is the way. Imagine business and commerce when love is the way. Imagine this tired, old world when love is the way. When love is the way — unselfish, sacrificial, redemptive — when love is the way, then no child will go to bed hungry in this world ever again. When love is the way, we will let justice roll down like a mighty stream, and righteousness like an ever-flowing brook.

When love is the way, poverty would become history. When love is the way, the earth will be a sanctuary. When love is the way, we will lay our swords and shields down by the riverside to study war no more. When love is the way, there’s plenty of room for all of God’s children. When love is the way, we actually treat each other, well, like we are actually family. When love is the way, we know that God is the source of us all, and we are brothers and sisters and children of God. Brothers and sisters — that’s a new heaven, a new earth, a new world, a new human family. Let me tell you something. Ole Solomon was right in the Old Testament. That’s fire.

French Jesuit Pierre Teilhard de Chardin was arguably one of the great minds, great spirits of the 20th century. Jesuit, Roman Catholic priest, scientist, a scholar, a true mystic. Some of his writings from his scientific background as well as his theological one, some of his writings said as others have said that the discovery and harnessing of fire was one of the great technological discoveries of human history. Fire to a great extent made human civilization possible. Fire made it possible to cook food, and to provide sanitary ways of eating, which reduced the spread of disease in its time. Fire made it possible to heat warm environments and thereby marking human migration a possibility even into colder climates. Fire made it possible — there was no Bronze Age without fire, no Iron Age without fire, no Industrial Revolution without fire. … Anybody get here in a car today? An Automobile? Nod your heads if you did, I know there were some carriages. Those of us who came in cars, the controlled-harnessed fire made that possible.

I know that the Bible says, and I believe it that Jesus walked on water, but I have to tell you I didn’t walk across the Atlantic Ocean to get here. Controlled fire in that plane got me here. Fire makes it possible for us to text, and tweet, and email, and Instagram and Facebook and socially be dysfunctional with each other. Fire makes that possible, and de Chardin said fire was one of the great discoveries in all of human history. He went on to say if humanity ever harnesses the energy of fire again, if humanity ever captured the energies of love, it will be the second time in the history that will have discovered fire.

Dr. King was right. We must discover love, the redemptive power of love. And when we do that, we will be able to make of this old world a new world.

My brother, my sister, God love you, God bless you. And may God hold us all in those almighty hands of love.”

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