Now Playing
Magic 105.3
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
Magic 105.3
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music

travel

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >

When can an airline force a ticketed passenger off a plane?

News of a man being forcibly removed from a United Airlines flight on Sunday after not voluntarily giving up his seat is making the rounds, raising questions about what authority airlines have to remove ticketed passengers in situations of overbooking.

>> Read more trending news

According to accounts from passengers on the flight, which was leaving from Chicago O’Hare International Airport and bound for Louisville, the airline wanted the seats for employees who needed to travel to be at work the next day. Cellphone video from the aircraft shows a man who said he was a doctor being forced from his seat and dragged down the aisle of the plane as onlookers screamed, “Oh, my God!” 

Related: Man forcibly removed from flight after not voluntarily giving up seat on overbooked flight

It hasn’t been a great few months for United Airlines. In March, the airline received widespread criticism for barring two teens from their flight because they were wearing leggings.

So in what situations do the airlines have the right to force ticketed passengers from a plane? And what is the protocol for doing so?

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, overbooking is legal, with most airlines overbooking their scheduled flights to a certain extent in order to compensate for no-shows. When overselling occurs, the DOT requires airlines to ask people to give up their seats voluntarily in exchange for compensation. If no one volunteers, the airline may then bump passengers involuntarily, although they too are entitled to compensation.

According to United’s Contract of Carriage, “If a flight is oversold, no one may be denied boarding against his/her will until UA or other carrier personnel first ask for volunteers who will give up their reservations willingly in exchange for compensation as determined by UA. If there are not enough volunteers, other passengers may be denied boarding involuntarily in accordance with UA’s boarding priority.”

The contract states that passengers with disabilities, unaccompanied minors under the age of 18 and minors ages 5-15 who use the unaccompanied minor service will be the last to be involuntarily denied boarding. It adds that “the priority of all other confirmed passengers may be determined based on a passenger’s fare class, itinerary, status of frequent flyer program membership, and the time in which the passenger presents him/herself for check-in without advanced seat assignment.”

According to the DOT’s Consumer Guide to Air Travel, airlines must give all passengers who are bumped involuntarily “a written statement describing their rights and explaining how the carrier decides who gets on an oversold flight and who doesn’t. Those travelers who don’t get to fly are frequently entitled to denied boarding compensation in the form of a check or cash. The amount depends on the price of their ticket and the length of the delay.”

DOT statistics show that, on average, only about one of every 10,000 airline passengers is bumped involuntarily, although that number can increase over the holidays and during other busy travel seasons.

United has said little about the incident but did release this response to WHAS: “Flight 3411 from Chicago to Louisville was overbooked. After our team looked for volunteers, one customer refused to leave the aircraft voluntarily and law enforcement was asked to come to the gate. We apologize for the overbook situation.”

United CEO Oscar Munoz later issued a statement on Twitter Monday, saying,  “Our team is moving with a sense of urgency to work with the authorities and conduct our own detailed review of what happened. We are also reaching out to this passenger to talk directly to him and further address and resolve this situation.”

Hundreds of bags abandoned after thousands of Delta flight cancellations

Although Delta Air Lines’ operations were finally returning to normal Monday after five days of thousands of flight cancellations, hundreds of stranded bags left on the airport floor and thousands of frustrated passengers remained in the aftermath of the airline’s chaotic period.

>> Read more trending news

Delta canceled close to 3,500 flights between Wednesday and Sunday, and many passengers became disconnected from their bags in the process, meaning that even after they got to their destinations, they were left without their packed clothing and other belongings.

>> Related: Here’s why one day of thunderstorms turned into a five-day Delta meltdown

Kerlene Moore was supposed to return home Thursday from a visit with her 3-year-old daughter to see her parents in Palm Beach. But after her flight was canceled, she never got her luggage back and had to buy new clothes during the four-day delay.

When she got into Atlanta Monday morning, she encountered rows of baggage lined up on the floor at baggage claim.

“They just told me to start here,” Moore said as she and her daughter, Kennedi, walked between the rows of baggage. “This is ridiculous. If I don’t find my bags, I don’t know what I’m going to do.”

Mikeal Dennard was trying to return from a trip to California when he had two Delta flights canceled on Wednesday and Thursday.

>> Related: Delta flight cancellations continue: “It was like a madhouse”

After spending hundreds of dollars extra and then finally booking a flight on Southwest and getting home on Friday, he learned that his baggage wouldn’t arrive until Sunday on Delta.

But on Monday, he didn’t find his baggage in the lines of suitcases as employees searched in the basement.

Dennard, Moore and many other passengers have also run into the problem of hours-long waits for customer service on Delta’s phone lines.

“Right now everybody’s so overwhelmed where they’re starting to lose bags,” Dennard said. “I think it’s partly disorganization.”

“I fly a lot ... This is the worst it’s ever been,” Dennard said. “It’s horrible.”

>> Related: Woman allegedly kicked off flight because of revealing top

>> Related: Pilot 'congratulates' passengers for drinking all alcohol on plane

Delta cancels 3,000 flights in thunderstorm fallout

Dozens of long lines of thousands of passengers trying to get help extended through the terminal Friday at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta, where Delta Airlines has its headquarters, as fallout from the airline’s flight cancellations extended into a third day.

>> Read more trending news 

Some flight cancellations continued Friday as the airline continued to struggle with getting available crews and aircraft positioned to operate flights.

Delta said it has canceled about 3,000 flights this week after a severe thunderstorm in Atlanta and the ensuing crew and aircraft positioning issues, making the total impact greater than the massive system outage that the airline experienced last year and snowstorms that virtually shut down flights at an airport.

The thunderstorm in Atlanta, which hit Delta’s largest hub on Wednesday, has caused effects that have reverberated through its flight network for days.

But the airline also warned that heavy spring break travel means there are few open seats for rebooking, leaving limited options for passengers whose flights were canceled.

Long lines for rebooking, baggage assistance and check-in at Delta counters filled the terminal in Atlanta on Friday morning, two days after the thunderstorm that triggered the flight disruptions.

For the second night in a row, weary travelers spread across the floor of the Hartsfield-Jackson terminal to try to sleep overnight after their flights were canceled Thursday. Some said they had been stuck on planes until 2 or 3 a.m. before a final flight cancellation left them stranded.

Delta’s systems were also overtaxed: Many travelers struggled to get information or rebookings from Delta’s app, its website or from its customer service phone line.

Thousands of people stood in line for hours in the concourses and in the terminal to try to get rebooked on flights back home or to their destinations.

Delta said those whose flights are canceled and who don’t travel are entitled to refunds. The airline is also waiving certain change fees for passengers affected by the disruptions who want to reschedule their flights.

“It looks like a disaster zone,” said traveler Shadow McKnight, who was trying to get home to Starkville, Mississippi. “Just how everybody is piled up on every available surface... I’ve never seen it like this.”

McKnight was scheduled to fly back to the Memphis airport Thursday evening at around 8 p.m., but said her flight was delayed until 10 p.m., then 11 p.m., then midnight. “And then they cancelled it,” she said, because the crew wasn’t able to get to Atlanta on their own flights.

“I was like, ‘This is just crazy,’” McKnight said, seeing the line stretching down the concourse for customer service. A Delta agent at the gate helped her and a few other passengers get rebooked.

To get to Memphis would require waiting until Saturday and spending another night in Atlanta. McKnight tried to get a rental car but found none available.

Instead, her husband will drive from Mississippi to Atlanta to pick her up, then head to the Memphis airport to pick up her car before going back to Starkville.

“At this point, I just have to get home,” said McKnight, a furniture designer who is trying to return home from a business trip to Louisville. She spent the night in the terminal. “I kind of just walked around for a while, then found a table and laid my head down.”

McKnight said she is understanding of the challenges that Delta has faced.

“It was just a series of unfortunate events,” McKnight said. “Nothing was in place to work out easily for them. I’ll fly Delta again. Everybody has bad days, right?”

Traveler Farzad Saghian said his flight back home to New York after a business trip was scheduled to depart at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, then was delayed until 11:30 p.m., 12:30 a.m., then 1:30 a.m.

“First they didn’t have a captain, then they didn’t have a crew” of flight attendants, Saghian said. “We waited until 3:30 (a.m.) until they just said yes, it’s canceled.”

Everyone was frustrated, he said: “They kept on giving us hopes: ‘Don’t worry, it’s not going to cancel.’

“I always fly Delta everywhere,” Saghian said. “For the past 20 years I’ve been with Delta. So I’m with them. I understand. It’s the weather. But they could have been a little more courteous. People were frustrated. There were babies in people’s hands.”

Saghian, who travels to Atlanta five times a year, had been in the airport for 14 hours by Friday morning and expected to wait another several hours for his rescheduled flight.

“It’s always busy, but I have never seen this airport like this,” Saghian said. “It was like a madhouse.”

TSA screener fired after woman gets loaded gun through airport security

WSB-TV has confirmed that the Transportation Security Administration fired a screener who missed a loaded handgun in a passenger’s carry-on bag Sunday morning at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

According to an Atlanta police incident report, Katrina Jackson, of Hoover, Alabama, discovered the handgun as she checked her purse for her passport at the gate.

“There’s one thing if you’re missing something suspicious. This was a handgun, so this is a big deal that this got through the TSA screening process,” security expert Brent Brown said.

>> Watch the news report here

Jackson told police about the gun, and officers showed up at the gate to confiscate her gun and her bag.

Jackson told them that she had a permit to carry from Alabama but did not have it with her.

Police arrested her. She is charged with unlawful possession of a handgun.

“I mean, she violated the law, so we have consequences,” passenger Melissa Monroe said.

A TSA spokesperson sent the following statement: “This egregious mistake was unacceptable and the officer, who was still a probationary employee, was immediately and permanently separated from federal service.”

>> Read more trending news

According to TSA, a screener’s probationary period lasts two years.

“We don’t know who else might have gotten through. This one person fortunately turned around and reported herself, but how many of these types of things get through all the time?” Brown said.

WSB-TV’s Aaron Diamant learned that TSA screeners detected 198 guns at Atlanta’s airport in 2016, more than any other U.S. airport.

Screeners have found 48 guns so far this year, including seven during the same week that the screener missed Jackson’s gun.

“This is a crazy world we live in, so, you know, things happen, and if it’s our time, it’s our time. But they’re doing a good job. I think they’re doing a good job,” passenger Tiffany Clinton said.

WSB-TV was unable to contact Jackson. The Clayton County solicitor general is handling her case.

Leggings on a plane: Delta weighs in on United Airlines controversy

It was the leggings policy heard ’round the world.

After United Airlines declined to allow girls who were wearing leggings to board a flight on pass travel and another passenger tweeted about it, the question of airline dress policies went viral.

>> PREVIOUS STORY: United Airlines kicks two girls off flight for wearing leggings

But some have also pointed out that airlines often have more stringent policies for employees’ friends or family who are traveling on reduced-rate buddy passes. It’s a familiar issue in Atlanta, where Delta Air Lines is the largest employer and the metro area is home to tens of thousands of airline employees.

Actress Justine Bateman, best known from the 1980s TV show “Family Ties,” is among those who pointed out the distinction on Twitter over the weekend.

>> Read more trending news

“To be fair, these guidelines for ’employee passes’ have been in place for decades. All the traveling airline employees know about them,” Bateman tweeted on Sunday.

“I had to do the same when I flew on ‘passes’ as a kid, to be fair,” she tweeted.

Delta says it does not have an “item-specific” clothing policy for employees and pass travel.

“We ask our employees and their family and friends flying on pass privileges to use their best judgment when deciding what to wear on a flight,” Delta said in a written statement.

And Delta emphasized that in a tweet on Monday.

U.S. temporarily bans larger electronics from cabins of certain flights

A temporary ban on carry-on electronics is set to take effect Tuesday on certain flights into the U.S., according to reporting from The Hill and supported by tweets posted by Royal Jordanian Airlines.

Those tweets have since been deleted but read, “Following instructions from the concerned U.S. departments, we kindly inform our dearest passengers departing to and arriving from the United States that carrying any electronic or electrical device on board the flight cabins is strictly prohibited,” according to The Hill.

>> Read more trending news 

The ban will be formally announced Tuesday but is said to affect 13 countries for the next 96 hours and is a response to a specific intelligence threat, The Hill reported, citing Fox News. The ban reportedly has nothing to do with President Donald Trump’s travel ban, two versions of which have now been struck down by courts across the country.

Affected countries, airlines and flights are in the process of being informed, CNN reported. The ban reportedly applies to all electronics except mobile phones and medical devices; items such as laptops, tablets and cameras may not be brought into the cabin but can fly in checked luggage.

Congressmen livestream 'bipartisan road trip' to D.C. amid snow, flight cancellations

Unable to get a flight back to snowed-in Washington, D.C., Texas Congressmen Will Hurd, a Republican from Helotes, and Beto O’Rourke, an El Paso Democrat, who did a veterans’ event together in San Antonio on Monday, decided to drive together to D.C. – a trip about 1,500 miles and 24 hours long.

<script>(function(d, s, id) {</span><br /><span>  var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];</span><br /><span>  if (d.getElementById(id)) return;</span><br /><span>  js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;</span><br /><span>  js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&amp;version=v2.8";</span><br /><span>  fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);</span><br /><span>}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));</script>BIPARTISAN ROAD TRIP: Because of the winter storm U.S. Representative Will Hurd and I are renting a car this morning and...Posted by Congressman Beto O'Rourke on Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Hurd said it was O’Rourke’s idea.

They picked up a Dollar rental Chevy Impala in San Antonio predawn Tuesday.

They went for taquitos at Mi Tierra, where they also bought a piñata mascot — which they have named WillieBeto — to place on the dashboard, though it slipped off.

Starting the day off right at Mi Tierra Cafe before hitting the road for work. 24 hrs to DC. Co-pilot @HurdOnTheHill pic.twitter.com/wZHHF2KQXC— Beto O'Rourke (@BetoORourke) March 14, 2017

They then stopped at Tantra Coffeehouse in San Marcos, and then headed for Austin, where they pulled over by the University of Texas to do a live spot on MSNBC, where they were asked what would be the ideal pairing for a Texas-to-D.C. road trip like the one they were on.

They passed on the suggestion that came through on O’Rourke’s Facebook livestream — Reps. Louie Gohmert, R-Tyler, and Shelia Jackson Lee, D-Houston.

>> Read more trending news

From there, they busted in on Texas Tribune CEO Evan Smith and "Meet the Press" moderator Chuck Todd just ahead of Smith’s interview of Todd for his KLRU show, "Overheard." 

Hurd was asked to offer an example of an issue on which he and O’Rourke agree.

“We both agree a border wall from sea to shining sea is the most expensive and least effective way to do border security,” Hurd said.

Cross country town hallPosted by Congressman Beto O'Rourke on Tuesday, March 14, 2017

From Austin, the road trip headed toward Waco on the way to Texarkana and the Arkansas line.

They said they would be guided by "the people" in their choice of route, but O’Rourke said he’d like to go through Memphis – which they eventually did. 

U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, old enough to be their father, phoned in to make sure there was no distracted driving going on.

Hurd assured him O’Rourke had a firm hand on the wheel.

>> 5 hacks to keep your smartphone charged during a power outage

But Cornyn’s connection wasn’t so good.

O’Rourke: “We lost Sen. Cornyn.”

They briefly stopped talking policy to listen to a little music.

First, Khalid from El Paso, and then, of course, Willie Nelson, "On the Road Again."

And then, off with the music for a phone interview with Bill Lambrecht of the San Antonio Express-News.

Lambrecht: “So whose wacky idea was this?”

And, “If you go to Memphis you might want to think about stopping by Graceland.” (They did, but it was closed.)

O’Rourke said that for both of them, “our party leadership is probably not really excited about us doing this” because they would each be seen as helping a member of the opposite party.

>> 7 tips to keep your pets safe during winter weather

“Screw that line of thinking,” O’Rourke said.

O’Rourke preferred to drive straight through to their destination. Hurd preferred to “stop and smell the roses.”

And use the facilities.

“Will has a small bladder,” O’Rourke said. “And we’ve been drinking a ton of coffee.”

At Hurd’s pace, O’Rourke said, “We’ll get to Washington by mid-summer.”

According to The Associated Press, they arrived at the Capitol on Wednesday "with minutes to spare before a 6:30 p.m. House vote."

Posted by U.S. Representative Will Hurd on Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Winter storm up north causes headaches for Orlando passengers

A winter storm in the northeast has canceled almost 8,000 flights nationwide, and the storm’s effects are being felt by travelers at Orlando International Airport.

With 60 million people in the massive storm’s path, each of the major airlines has grounded all flights to New York City.

The cancellations had parts of OIA looking more like a slumber party than an airport.

Flight tracker: Click here to check the status of your flight

Among those sleeping in a terminal was traveler Mayker Campous, who said he would wake up every five to 10 minutes before dozing off again because he was sleeping in a chair.

>> Read more trending news  

“We (slept) here all night because our flight was canceled,” he said.

>>Boston: More than 500 flights canceled ahead of major nor'easter

Campous said he hopes to depart on time Wednesday.

Some airlines have waived fees or offered vouchers for the inconvenience.

>>Delta Airlines cancels more than 900 flights due to storm

JetBlue said it will waive change/cancellation fees and pay for fare differences for customers departing from a list of cities affected by the storm, including New York City, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and Boston.

JetBlue customers have until Sunday to rebook their flights. They may opt for a refund if their flight was canceled, the company said.

Not all airlines are as accommodating, passengers said, so officials said customers should contact individual airlines to ask if anything is being offered.

'The Handmaid's Tale' is making SXSW 100 percent more unsettling

One way to promote a TV show at South by Southwest: opening a pop-up chicken restaurant. Another way: terrifying people to death. Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” went for option No. 2 this weekend in Austin, Texas.

As Statesman Shots co-hosts Omar Gallaga and Tolly Moseley explained in an episode of the podcast Saturday, they came across stoically marching ladies in red on their way to the Los Pollos Hermanos installation promoting AMC’s “Better Call Saul.” They were not the only people startled by the guerilla marketing for the dystopian drama.

>> For complete SXSW coverage, head to Statesman.comMyStatesman.com512tech.com and Austin360.com

All these (presumably) Handmaid's Tale folks are scaring me. #sxsw pic.twitter.com/VkXHYzhsUI— Anthony Balderrama (@anthelonious) March 10, 2017 <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

A bunch of Handmaid's Tale handmaids are freaking people out at SXSW.https://t.co/6MM5hmB7jl pic.twitter.com/cHaBixOzX5— io9 (@io9) March 11, 2017 <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

>> Read more trending news

Holy cats - Handmaid's Tale right outside the Austin convention center! #sxsw https://t.co/wjtia7Ilmi— Christopher Lucas (@ChristophrLucas) March 12, 2017 <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Happy nightmares, SXSW. 

Delta fined $90,000 for inadequate food service during tarmac delays

The federal government is fining Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines $90,000 for not offering passengers adequate food during long tarmac delays in Atlanta and New York.

A consent order issued Thursday by the U.S. Department of Transportation says that during lengthy tarmac delays last July on two flights from New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport and two flights from Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, “the evidence indicates that limited or no food service was provided.”

Federal rules require that airlines provide “adequate food and water no later than two hours after an aircraft leaves the gate if the aircraft remains on the tarmac.”

>> Read more trending news  

But the DOT says that didn’t happen on the flights from New York to Atlanta and Spain’s Malaga airport, and from Atlanta to Greenville-Spartanburg and Portland, Maine.

On the Atlanta to Greenville-Spartanburg flight July 21, “it appears that Delta failed to have adequate provisions onboard to provide snack service to all passengers during the delay,” according to the DOT.

And for the Atlanta to Portland, Maine flight on the same day, evidence “indicates that Delta provided only water to the passengers onboard before the tarmac delay exceeded two hours.”

The carrier responded that passengers were not kept on the tarmac for more than three hours without the opportunity to get off the plane for any of the four flights.

However, Delta said it “acknowledges and regrets that the manner of distribution of snacks was not ideal.” The airline consented to the cease-and-desist order and the $90,000 fine.

200 items
Results 31 - 40 of 200 < previous next >