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Prince William: Princess Charlotte is going to be ‘trouble’

The Duke of Cambridge is well aware of what he’s in for when daughter Princess Charlotte gets older, and he’s getting ready.

>> Read more trending news

“She’s going to be trouble when she gets older,” Prince William told Pagan Tordengrav while visiting with patients at Aintree University Hospital on Thursday. “All fathers say that to me — watch out for the little girls.”

The royal’s joke comes a few months after the 2-year-old princess threw a royal fit on a tarmac in Germany. Luckily mom Duchess Kate came to the rescue and calmed her down, but the adorable photos still circulated online. Even earlier this year, the Duchess of Cambridge admitted Princess Charlotte is “the one in charge” of their household.

On the other hand, Prince William said he believes his son will a breeze as he grows up.

“George has been really easy,” he told patient Theresa Jones when asked about George starting school. “He hasn’t said, ‘Have I got to do this for the rest of my life?'”

UK raises terror alert level to ‘critical’ following train bombing

Several people were injured at a London underground station Friday after a blast on a packed commuter train, Reuters reported.

>> Read more trending news 

Who are the Rohingya Muslims? 7 things to know about the 'world’s most persecuted minority'

Since August, more than 370,000 Rohingya Muslims have escaped the Buddhist-majority country of Myanmar, where they are denied citizenship and reportedly face an array of human rights abuses, to seek refuge in neighboring countries such as Bangladesh.

>> Read more trending news

Many Rohingya refugees have been turned away, leaving thousands stranded at sea.

Zeid Ra‘ad al-Hussein, the United Nations human rights chief, has called what's happening to Rohingya in Myanmar “a textbook example of ethnic cleansing.”

Who are the Rohingya and where do they live?

The Rohingya are a Muslim ethnic group living primarily in the Buddhist nation of Myanmar (or Burma). There are approximately 1.1 million Rohingya living in the country.

According to Al Jazeera, the Rohingya have been described as the “world’s most persecuted minority,” and have faced systematic persecution since Myanmar’s independence in the late 1940s.

Most Rohingya in Myanmar reside in the Rakhine State on the country’s western coast.

Rakhine State is regarded as one of the country’s poorest areas and lacks basic services in education and health care.

The Rohingya’s history in Myanmar

According to historians, the group has been residing in Arakan (now Rakhine State) since as early as the 12th century, Al Jazeera reported.

When the British ruled between 1824 and 1948, they administered Myanmar as a province of India and, thus, any migration of laborers between Myanmar and other South Asian countries (like Bangladesh) was considered internal. The majority of the native Myanmar population did not like that.

After gaining independence in 1948, the Burmese government still frowned upon any migration that occurred during the period of British rule, claiming it all to be illegal.

In fact, many Buddhists in Myanmar consider the Ronhingya to be Bengali, or people from Bangladesh.

The discriminatory 1982 Citizenship Law officially prevented them from obtaining citizenship.

And according to a Human Rights Watch report from 2000, this is the basis the Myanmar government uses to deny Rohingya citizenship in the country.

Over the years, military crackdowns on the Rohingya have forced hundreds of thousands to escape.

According to the HRW report, Rohingya refugees reported that the Burmese army had forcibly evicted them. Many also alleged widespread army brutality, rape and murder.

Between 1991 and 1992, more than 250,000 Rohingya refugees fled to southeastern Bangladesh. But with the influx of refugees, the Bangladeshi government insisted the refugees return to Arakan (Rakhine State).

By 1997, according to the HRW report, some 230,000 refugees returned.

That same year, the Burmese government said it would not accept any more returning refugees after Aug. 15, 1997, leading to a series of disturbances in Bangladeshi refugee camps.

The Human Rights Watch has called the crisis a deadly game of “human ping-pong.”

What’s happening to the Rohingya now?

Myanmar, a Buddhist-majority country, continues to deny the Rohingya citizenship, freedom to travel, access to education and the group still faces harsh systematic persecution.

In October 2016, the Burmese government blamed members of the Rohingya for the killings of nine border police, leading to a crackdown on Rakhine State villages in which troops were accused of rape, extrajudicial killing and other human rights abuses — all allegations they denied.

And most recently in August, violence erupted after Rohingya fighters were accused of attacking police posts and an army base in Rakhine, Al Jazeera reported.

Following the August event, at least 370,000 Rohingya Muslims fled to Bangladesh to escape the aforementioned allegations of human rights abuses, according to the Associated Press.

Women, children and the elderly made up the bulk of the that group.

Over the past three years, hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have tried to escape by boat to neighboring countries that refuse to let them in.

Approximately 8,000 migrants have been stranded at sea.

Why won’t other countries take them in?

Many of Myanmar’s neighboring countries, including Bangladesh and Thailand, refuse to take them in.

The Thai navy has actually turned them away.

Lex Rieffel, an expert on Southeast Asia at the Brookings Institution, told NPR in 2015 that the Buddhist-majority nation of Thailand has been battling an Islamist insurgency for decades and has "no stomach" for bringing in more Muslims.

“Where will the budget come from? That money will need to come from Thai people's taxes, right?” Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha told reporters in 2015.

Malaysia and Indonesia, despite being Muslim-majority nations, have also prevented Rohingya from entering their countries, citing “social unrest.” And Indonesia worries about “an uncontrolled influx.”

“What do you expect us to do?” Malaysian Deputy Home Minister Wan Junaidi Jafaar told The Guardian in 2015. “We have been very nice to the people who broke into our border. We have treated them humanely, but they cannot be flooding our shores like this.”

What is Aung San Suu Kyi saying?

The crisis has drawn worldwide criticism of Myanmar's government and its leader, Nobel Peace Prize recipient Aung San Suu Kyi

According to the BBC, Suu Kyi said “a huge iceberg of misinformation” was distorting the crisis.

“We know very well, more than most, what it means to be deprived of human rights and democratic protection,” she is quoted as saying to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in a recent statement. “So, we make sure that all the people in our country are entitled to protection of their rights as well as ... not just political but social and humanitarian defence.”

But stories of human rights abuse can't be investigated because of the Burmese government’s decision to deny media access to its troubled areas, BBC’s Tn Htar Swe said.

"If they allowed the UN or human rights bodies to go to the place to find out what is happening then ... misinformation is not going to take place.”

Condemnation of Suu Kyi’s inaction and response have led to calls for the rescindment of her Nobel Peace Prize, which she won in 1991 as a result of her long fight for democracy in Burma. According to the Washington Post, the Nobel Committee said that will not happen.

How is the world reacting to the Rohingya crisis?

International aid to much of Myanmar’s Rakhine State have been suspended, leaving approximately 250,000 Rohingya Muslims without medical care, food and other vital humanitarian assistance, the Human Rights Watch reported Tuesday.

“The United Nations, ASEAN and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation need to ramp up the pressure on Burma, and provide more assistance to Bangladesh, to promptly help Rohingya and other displaced people,” said Philippe Bolopion, deputy diretor for global advocacy at Human Rights Watch.

Earlier this year, the United Nations Human Rights Council approved an investigative mission, but was denied entry into Myanmar in June. And when an envoy entered in July, the visit was met with protests.

On Monday, the White House released this statement: “We call on Burmese security authorities to respect the rule of law, stop the violence and end the displacement of civilians from all communities.”

Bangladesh, which is facing the largest influx of Rohingyas from Myanmar, has called on the international community to intervene.

The Organization of Islamic Cooperation, the world's largest Muslim body, issued a statement Tuesday urging Muslim countries to work together to help the Rohingya refugees.

Who is helping the Rohingya?

Aid groups continue efforts to reach Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar and send aid to refugee camps.

According to the Indian Express, India announced it is sending an aircraft Thursday that will carry the first shipment of humanitarian assistance to Bangladesh for Rohingya Muslim refugees.

“We want to go home and we want peace. But I believe the world is watching our crisis and that they are trying to help us,” Rahimol Mustafa, a 22-year-old Rohingya Muslim, told Al Jazeera in an interview Tuesday.

Mustafa fled Rakhine State a few weeks ago and is currently safe at a refugee camp in Bangladesh, but with “no shelter and no future.”

Read Mustafa’s story on AlJazeera.com

Earthquake hits southern coast of Mexico, triggers tsunami

Updated 2:10 p.m. EDT Sept. 9: The death toll from an 8.1-magnitude earthquake that stuck Mexico earlier this week has risen to 64, according to The Associated Press.

Officials in the state of Chiapas told the news wire that 15 people died there as a result of Thursday night’s quake. Forty-five others were reported dead in Oaxaca while four others were killed in Tabasco.

Update 4:30 p.m. EDT Sept. 8

According to the AP, the death toll in the wake of an earthquake of the coast of southern Mexico Friday has risen to 58. 

Update 2:49 p.m. EDT Sept. 8: 

The Associated Press reported that the death toll from an earthquake off the coast of southern Mexico on Friday has risen to at least 35.

Update 10:57 a.m. EDT Sept. 8: The Associated Press reported that the death toll from an earthquake off the coast of southern Mexico on Friday has risen to at least 32.

The news wire reported that at least 23 people were killed in Oaxaca, citing state Gov. Alejandro Murat. At least seven people died in the state of Chiapas and two others died in the state of Tabasco, the AP reported.

Original report: An earthquake measuring a preliminary magnitude of 8.1 on the Richter scale hit off the coast of southern Mexico on Friday, killing at least 15 people and triggering a tsunami, CNN reported. The Associated Press reported that five people were killed, including two children in Tabasco state.

>> Read more trending news

The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake, which occurred near the border between Mexico and Guatemala, was felt as far as Mexico City and Guatemala City. It struck off the Pacific coast, 74 miles southwest of Tres Picos, Mexico, which is 600 miles southeast of Mexico City, CNN reported.

A tsunami has been confirmed in Mexico, CNN reported, with one wave coming in at 2.3 feet, according to a tweet from the National Weather Service's Pacific Tsunami Warning Center's verified account.

The USGS has reported multiple aftershocks, including four with tremors measuring above 5.0 in magnitude.

The main quake had a depth of 69.7 kilometers, according to the USGS. It was a particularly shallow quake, according to USGS geophysicist Jana Pursely.

"The shaking along the coast of Chiapas at this point is estimated to be very strong to severe," Pursely told CNN. "I would expect damage along the coast of Chiapas."

Chiapas Gov. Manuel Velasco told Foro TV that there have been reports of damage, including hospitals that have lost power and buildings with collapsed roofs, CNN reported. Schools will be canceled Friday, he said.

Authorities said they were evacuating residents in Puerto Madero in Chiapas as a precaution due to the tsunami alert, the AP reported.

Photos: Mexico rocked by 8.1 earthquake

An earthquake measuring a preliminary magnitude of 8.1 on the Richter scale hit off the coast of southern Mexico on Friday, killing at least two people and triggering a tsunami, CNN reported. The Associated Press reported that 35 people were killed, including two children in Tabasco state.

World-famous airport ravaged by Hurricane Irma

An airport famous for its easy to see, low-flying airplanes was left devastated after Hurricane Irma swept through the Caribbean on Wednesday.

>> Read more trending news

Princess Juliana International Airport, in St. Maarten, the Dutch side of St. Martin island, was inaccessible Wednesday, according to the Royal Netherlands Navy.

Officials released a photo taken from a helicopter of the airport after Hurricane Irma slammed through the region with winds topping 175 mph. Nearby buildings appeared to have had their roofs torn off and debris appeared scattered across the airport's field.

The airport closed Tuesday afternoon in anticipation of the storm.

The eye of Hurricane Irma passed over St. Martin around 8 a.m. Wednesday, the Miami Herald reported. Photos posted by French weather observatory Kerauos showed sand and debris inside the airport and spread across the tarmac.

The airport is popular among visitors who would gather at nearby Maho Beach to watch the planes fly relatively close overhead, The Washington Post reported. Planes landing at or taking off from the airport had to fly low because of the runway's proximity to the shoreline.

“It’s just heartbreaking to see the airport, the homes and hotels in ruins,” Julie Young, a Virginia resident who visited St. Martin in June, told The Washington Post. “The Maho Beach plane-watching was spectacular.”

Dutch officials told The Associated Press that at least one person was killed in St. Maarten as a result of Irma. 

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said Irma was a storm of “epic proportions” that left “wide-scale destruction of infrastructure, houses and businesses,” according to the AP.

“Houses are under water, cars are floating through the streets, inhabitants are sitting in the dark, in ruined houses and are cut off from the outside world,” Rutte said after a meeting of the government’s crisis committee.

The island territory is home to about 40,000 people.

Prince William takes Prince George to his first day at prep school

Prince George has just accomplished a milestone, as he went to his first day of prep school in southwest London.

>> Read more trending news 

In a moment that mimicked one of Princess Diana and Prince William 30 years ago, George was escorted to Thomas’s Battersea by his father, The Guardian reported.

Missing in the first-day-of school moment was Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, who was absent due to her severe morning sickness from her third pregnancy.

>>Read: Prince William, Kate Middleton expecting third child

Well wishers jammed the fence outside the school to watch as the princes arrived.

The school is said to be teaching George, who will be going by the name George Cambridge, how to be kind, gain confidence, leadership and humility, The Guardian reported.

Like any 4-year-old, George looked a little unsure as he walked up to greet the head of the school. His father, despite being second in line to the throne, carried his son’s bag.

Thomas’s Battersea costs $23,000 a year, CNN reported.

Putin: North Korea should learn from fall of Saddam Hussein

Russian President Vladimir Putin urged North Korea to learn from the fall of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, warning that it could suffer a similar fate unless it tones down its nuclear program, CNN reported.

>> Read more trending news

Putin, speaking at the close of the BRICs summit in China on Tuesday, warned against "military hysteria" in solving the Korean crisis, claiming it could lead to a "global catastrophe with a lot of victims."

North Korea launched its sixth test of a nuclear weapon Sunday with seismological data indicating the weapon was the most powerful ever to be detonated by Pyongyang, according to nuclear experts.

Putin said Pyongyang should take a lesson from history, invoking Hussein’s demise as Iraq’s dictator in 2006, CNN reported.

"Saddam Hussein rejected the production of weapons of mass destruction, but even under that pretense, he was destroyed and members of his family were killed," Putin said. "The country was demolished and Saddam Hussein was hanged. Everyone knows that and everyone in North Korea knows that.

"Do you really think due to some sanctions that North Korea will turn away from the path they've undertaken to create weapons of mass destruction?

"Russia condemns this action from North Korea. We think these actions take a provocative character, but we should not forget and North Koreans should not forget what happened in Iraq.”

'Peppa Pig' episode banned in Australia

An episode of the popular children’s show “Peppa Pig” was pulled off the air for a second time in Australia as some viewers complained it encouraged children to play with dangerous spiders, The Guardian reported.

>> Read more trending news

“Mister Skinny Legs,” a 2004 episode, was removed from online publication by the national public broadcaster, the ABC, in 2012 for sending the “inappropriate” message that spiders were friendly and not to be feared.

In the offending episode, Daddy Pig tells a frightened Peppa that spiders are “very, very small” and “can’t hurt you” after a spider enters her room.

That was considered “inappropriate for Australian audiences,” and the ABC banned it.

On Aug. 25, the episode was aired again on Nick Jr, a children’s channel affiliated with Nickelodeon and available on the Australian pay TV service Foxtel.

A Sydney woman identified as Jess told Fairfax Media she complained to Nick Jr. The channel initially refused to pull the episode, saying Mister Skinny Legs “did not look real.”

Australia’s dangerous spider species include the venomous redback spider, the funnel-web spider, white-tailed spider and wolf-spider, according to the Australian Museum. An estimated 2,000 people are bitten each year by redback spiders, and 40 by funnel webs. 

The five-minute episode shows the two children discovering the spider in the bathroom sink and befriending it. At the end of the episode, the children pour it a cup of tea alongside a set of dolls. “We are all going to have tea with Mister Skinny Legs,” Peppa says. “Peppa likes Mister Skinny Legs, everyone likes Mister Skinny Legs,” the narrator says.

Convicted Italian crime boss arrested in Uruguay

A top crime syndicate boss convicted of drug trafficking was arrested in Uruguay after being on the run since 1994, Uruguay’s Interior Ministry said in a statement.

>> Read more trending news

Rocco Morabito -- described as a prominent member of the Calabrian Mafia known as the Ndrangheta -- was living in a luxury villa and was using a false Brazilian passport, CNN reported.

Morabito was convicted in absentia for drug trafficking and organized-crime activities in Italy and sentenced to 30 years in prison.

Italian authorities said that Morabito had been responsible for shipping drugs into Italy and arranging distribution in Milan.

The Uruguayan Interior Ministry said Morabito was arrested Friday in a hotel in the Uruguayan capital of Montevideo, CNN reported. Italian police said the arrest followed "months of international cooperation and intelligence activity."

Italian Interior Minister Marco Minniti said Morabito was "considered one of the sought-after members of the Ndrangheta".

Uruguayan authorities said some months ago Morabito tried to enroll his daughter in a local school using his real name, and his fingerprints were confirmed by Italian authorities, CNN reported.

Authorities said Morabito entered Uruguay in 2001 using false Brazilian identification papers, including a bogus birth certificate. For the last decade he lived in a rural villa near the town of Maldonado, CNN reported.

When he was arrested, Morabito had 13 cell phones, an automatic pistol, 12 credit and debit cards, a large quantity of Uruguayan money and $50,000 in United States currency, plus currency certificates worth US $100,000, the Uruguayan Interior Ministry said.

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