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The daily commute's a killer in Mackintosh's 'I See You'

Zoe Walker's troubles creep beyond the financial woes on her desk, an overbearing boss, two aimless children who don't get along with her boyfriend and a boyfriend who's jealous of her ex-husband. Now she's dealing with a possible murderer on her trail in Clare Mackintosh's newest thriller, "I See You."

Zoe's commute is routine. She knows exactly where to stand on the Tube platform in London, just where to lean during the ride and which carriage positions her nearest the station exit once she's arrived. It's during this daily trip home from work one evening when Zoe discovers her picture is being used to advertise what appears to be a dating website in the back of a newspaper. Unable to trace the source, she attempts to brush it off. Each day, a new woman's photo appears in the ad, which seems odd but harmless, until one of them is assaulted and another is murdered. Someone is attacking the women in the ads, and the only thing the victims have in common is their daily commute on the subway.

Zoe shares narration with the police officer working the case and the killer, providing readers a 360-degree view of the crimes. While free of too many tangled side plots vying for attention, Mackintosh allots her characters the perfect amount of back story, allowing them to carry their own weight throughout the investigation. She also casts enough extras to keep readers guessing who could be behind these attacks.

With a theatrical ending, readers may find themselves wanting to reread this one, plugging in their newfound knowledge of the killer's identity into each twisted scene. It's easy to lock your doors, but what do you do if it's the person beside you on the train who's out for blood?

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Online:

https://claremackintosh.com/

Fox News host Brenda Buttner dies at age 55

Brenda Buttner, host of Fox News Channel's "Bulls and Bears" has died after a battle with cancer. She was 55.

Buttner served as CNBC's Washington correspondent and hosted the network's "The Money Club" before joining Fox News in 2000.

Buttner graduated from Harvard University and was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University.

Fox News host Neil Cavuto paid tribute to Buttner on his show "Your World with Neil Cavuto." He praised her intelligence and sense of humor, saying "business journalism is never going to be the same."

Fox News announced her death on Monday.

David Cassidy fighting memory loss, wants to 'enjoy life'

Former "Partridge Family" star David Cassidy says he's struggling with memory loss.

The 66-year-old actor-singer tells People magazine his family has a history of dementia and he had sensed "this was coming." He says for now he wants to stay focused and "enjoy life."

Cassidy has had numerous personal problems in the decades following his initial success, ranging from substance abuse to bankruptcy. He's the stepson of actress and fellow "Partridge Family" star Shirley Jones.

Hot sauce and hope for Conan O'Brien in Mexico

The towering U.S. television host Conan O'Brien is drawing stares in Mexico, where he's taping an episode of his show in a bid to "do something positive" about the tensions in U.S.-Mexico relations.

O'Brien, who is 6-feet-4, arrived late last week and has spent part of his time in Mexico City strolling the streets, greeting people and trying the food.

On Monday he stopped by one of the city's fancier taco restaurants and wound up trying hot sauce straight out of the bowl as restaurant patrons taped the scene on their phones. Some gasped, "No!"

O'Brien said: "Now, I am Mexican. I am also dying."

He doesn't think his outreach marks a turning point in bilateral relations, but said, "Everyone has to do their part."

Don Lemon silences panelist over 'fake news' claims

References to fake news have been dominating media and headlines for weeks now, with a surge since President Donald Trump accused CNN of being fake news after the network promoted unflattering stories about him.

>> Read more trending stories 

Fake news became a popular phrase during the 2016 election. Americans' sharing of unverified or outright false stories has not been exclusive to Republicans or Democrats, but symptomatic of growing extreme partisanship of election news coverage.

Unfortunately, fake news hasn’t gone anywhere and continues to be a problem for both liberals and conservatives, and news outlets have been forced to continue covering the topic. For some people, “fake news” has become a convenient catch-all phrase to deflect points of view they don’t like.

That belief is what sent CNN’s Don Lemon over the edge during an interview on Friday night. 

Lemon was leading a discussion about the cost of protecting the Trump family as they continue to maintain residence in the White House and New York City and consistently frequent Trump’s Mar-a-Lago property in Florida. There is concern that the American taxpayers will end up footing the bill of the enormous cost to protect the Trump family as they continue to travel so frequently. Maria Cardona and Karine Jean-Pierre said Trump’s actions are hypocritical considering how much he criticized then-President Obama for the cost of his travels.

“I think it's complete hypocrisy,” panelist and former White House staffer Karine Jean-Pierre told Lemon on the show. “He chastised President Obama for going on vacation, for golfing, and President Obama had less vacation, fewer vacation days than his predicesor, President George W. Bush.”

Lemon then turned his attention to panelist Paris Dennard, who Trump praised recently for doing “an amazing job in a very hostile CNN community.” Dennard told Lemon, “I think this is fake news. This is not a news story.”

Lemon was immediately stirred, asking Dennard if he knows the definition of fake news.

Lemon the defended the newscast's discussion, saying, “There’s nothing fake about that. Please stop it with that stupid talking point that it is a fake news story. If you don’t want to participate in the news stories on this network, then don’t come on and participate. But don’t call them fake because you don’t agree with them.”

Lemon’s words didn’t do anything to change Dennard’s view of the situation, as he reiterated once again that the story was fake news. At that point in the conversation, Lemon abruptly cut him off and cut the newscast short.

Watch the incident below.

Milo Yiannopoulos, Larry Wilmore go head-to-head on 'Maher'

While conservative provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos insulted comics Lena Dunham, Leslie Jones, Amy Schumer and Sarah Silverman, his appearance on HBO's "Real Time with Bill Maher" was relatively tame — at least until the television cameras were turned off.

It was later, during an online-only "Overtime" segment of Maher's Friday night show, that two of Maher's three panelists hurled expletives at the Breitbart News senior editor.

Maher's booking of Yiannopoulos, author of the upcoming book "Dangerous," drew attention earlier this week when journalist Jeremy Scahill backed out of the show because of his "hateful diatribes." The conservative gadfly has become a lightning rod; his planned speech at the University of California, Berkeley, was cancelled earlier this month when protests erupted.

Maher, a free speech advocate, told Yiannopoulos that he thought he was "colossally wrong" on most issues, "but if I barred everyone from the show who I thought was colossally wrong, I would be talking to myself."

Yiannopoulos called Maher his "favorite liberal" and directed most of his ire at female comedians.

"Your side has gone insane," he said. "The Democrats are the party of Lena Dunham. These people are hideous, mental people. The more the American people see of Lena Dunham, the fewer votes the Democratic Party is going to get."

Responded Maher about the "Girls" creator: "Let's not pick on fellow HBO stars."

The Breitbart editor said Schumer and Silverman "used to be funny before they contracted feminism." After the subject was brought up by Maher, he renewed hostilities with Jones that had begun with his review of the "Ghostbusters" film. Yiannopoulos' Twitter account was suspended last year after a series of racially insensitive tweets were directed at Jones, who is black.

On Maher's show, he called Jones "barely literate."

Still, the interview segment featured few harsh exchanges with Maher, and Yiannopoulos was not included in a panel discussion that featured comedian Larry Wilmore, author and counterterrorism expert Malcolm Nance and U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston, a Georgia Republican. But online, Yiannopoulos joined the other three to answer questions from viewers.

That's when things got interesting.

The starting-off point was when Yiannopoulos defended his criticism of a transgender person and saying, without offering evidence, that transgender people were involved in a disproportionate number of sex crimes. Wilborn objected, saying that reminded him of the attitudes people directed at gays and blacks to demonize them in society. He noted that for a long time, homosexuality was considered a disorder.

"Maybe it is," said Yiannopoulos, who is gay.

"Maybe you are," Wilborn said, "But most homosexuals are not."

Nance observed that Yiannopoulos seemed confused about who and what he was. When Maher tried to referee, Yiannopoulos said that he always seemed to have "awful" people on the show, "who are so stupid."

That's when Wilmore exploded, telling Yiannopoulos to "go f--- yourself." Maher defended Nance, telling Yiannopoulos that "this guy has done things that allow you to" live.

When the oddity of an openly gay man being seen as a leader of the alt-right movement was pointed out, Yiannopoulos said that "the worst people on the far left and far right all hate me."

Retorted Wilmore: "I think you're leaving out a lot of people."

Nance added another expletive when the Breitbart editor said he had no problems with the issue of President Donald Trump and ties to Russian, profanely dismissing him because he was not an American. Yiannopoulos is British.

It stopped there. Kingston declined a chance to be the third panelist to swear at Yiannopoulos.

Guest lineups for the Sunday news shows

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

ABC's "This Week" — Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.; Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif; retired Vice Adm. Robert Harward.

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NBC's "Meet the Press" — White House chief of staff Reince Priebus; Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.

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CBS' "Face the Nation" — Priebus; Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; Reps. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., and Elijah Cummings, D-Md.

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CNN's "State of the Union" — Gov. John Kasich, R-Ohio; Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J.; James Jones, former President Barack Obama's first national security adviser.

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"Fox News Sunday" — Priebus

'Twin Peaks' star Warren Frost dead at 91

Warren Frost, who starred on "Twin Peaks" and appeared in dozens of other TV shows including "Matlock" and "Seinfeld," died Friday in Middebury, Vermont, The Associated Press reported. He was 91.

>> Read more trending news

Frost died at his home after a lengthy illness, according to a statement from his son, "Twin Peaks" co-creator Mark Frost. The nature of the illness was not disclosed.

Warren Frost played Dr. Will Hayward on “Twin Peaks,” serving as the physician in the small town where strange things happen. He reprised his role for an upcoming Showtime sequel to the 1990-91 cult drama that will be aired in May.

Warren Frost played the father of George Costanza’s fiancée Susan on five episodes of “Seinfeld,” Variety reported. He also limned a recurring character on the Andy Griffith legal drama “Matlock” and had guest shots on series including “The Larry Sanders Show,” “L.A. Law” and “Murphy Brown.”

“We’re saddened today to announce the passing of our dear old dad, Warren Frost,” Mark Frost said in a statement. “From the Normandy shores on D-Day to his 50-year career on stage and screen, he remained the same humble guy from Vermont who taught us that a life devoted to telling the right kind of truths can make a real difference in the lives of others. We’re grateful to have shared him with the world for as long as we did.”

Born in Massachusetts in 1925, Frost spent his early years in the Bronx before moving to Vermont, Variety reported. He joined the Navy at age 17 after graduating from high school in 1942. He spent three years as a First Class Petty Officer and was part of the D-Day invasion at Normandy, with his ship serving a minesweeper in advance of the Allied armada to come.

He attended Middlebury College in Vermont, where he met his future wife, Virginia Calhoun, and then began his TV career in New York with jobs that included stage manager for early shows, the AP reported.

After moving to Los Angeles in 1958, Frost worked steadily on TV series including "Dragnet" and “Perry Mason” appeared in movies including "The Mating Game" and "It Started with a Kiss."

Frost retired in 2000.

Warren Frost, Dr. Will Hayward on 'Twin Peaks,' dies at 91

Warren Frost, who played Dr. Will Hayward on "Twin Peaks" and appeared in dozens of other TV shows including "Matlock" and "Seinfeld," has died. He was 91.

Frost died Friday at his home in Middlebury, Vermont, after a lengthy illness, according to a statement from his son, "Twin Peaks" co-creator Mark Frost. The nature of the illness was not disclosed.

He "taught us that a life devoted to telling the right kind of truths can make a real difference in the lives of others," Mark Frost said in the statement released by the Showtime channel.

Warren Frost reprised his "Twin Peaks" role for an upcoming Showtime sequel to the 1990-91 cult drama.

The New England native served in the Navy in World War II and was aboard a ship that took part in the 1944 Allied D-Day invasion, according to a biography.

He went on to attend Middlebury College in Vermont, where he met his future wife, Virginia Calhoun, and then began his TV career in New York with jobs that included stage manager for early shows.

After moving to Los Angeles in 1958, Frost worked steadily on TV series including "Dragnet" and appeared in movies including "The Mating Game" and "It Started with a Kiss."

He went on to earn a master's degree from Occidental College in California and a doctorate from the University of Minnesota, where he was part of the theater department faculty for 20 years and acted regularly in local productions.

Renewing his screen career in Los Angeles in the 1990s, he appeared in "Seinfeld" as Mr. Ross, the father to George Costanza's ill-fated fiancee Susan, and played pal Billy to "Matlock" star Andy Griffith's character.

Frost retired to Middlebury in 2000 but returned to work to appear in the new "Twin Peaks," set to debut in May.

Frost's survivors, besides wife Virginia and son Mark, include son Scott, a novelist and photographer, daughter Lindsay, an artist, and three grandchildren.

Guest lineups for the Sunday news shows

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

ABC's "This Week" — Vice Admiral Robert Harward.

___

NBC's "Meet the Press" — Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.

___

CBS' "Face the Nation" — Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; Reps. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., and Elijah Cummings, D-Md.

___

CNN's "State of the Union" — Gov. John Kasich, R-Ohio; Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J.; James Jones, former President Barack Obama's first national security adviser.

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"Fox News Sunday" — White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus; radio host Rush Limbaugh.

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