Now Playing
Magic 105.3
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
Magic 105.3
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music

entertainment

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >

Syrian poet Adonis wins $50,000 lifetime achievement prize

Syrian poet and translator Adonis has won a $50,000 prize from PEN America for lifetime achievement. The literary and human rights organization also has handed out prizes for best book of 2016 and best debut fiction.

At a Manhattan ceremony on Monday night, with the theme "Books Across Borders," PEN announced that Adonis was the recipient of the PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature. Hisham Matar's memoir about his native Libya, "The Return," won the $75,000 PEN/Jean Stein Book Award for the year's best work. Rion Amilcar Scott's story collection "Insurrections" won the $25,000 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut fiction. Angela Morales' "The Girls in My Town," about growing up Mexican-American in Los Angeles, was given the $10,000 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay.

Syrian poet Adonis wins $50,000 lifetime achievement prize

Syrian poet and translator Adonis has won a $50,000 prize from PEN America for lifetime achievement. The literary and human rights organization also has handed out prizes for best book of 2016 and best debut fiction.

At a Manhattan ceremony on Monday night, with the theme "Books Across Borders," PEN announced that Adonis was the recipient of the PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature. Hisham Matar's memoir about his native Libya, "The Return," won the $75,000 PEN/Jean Stein Book Award for the year's best work. Rion Amilcar Scott's story collection "Insurrections" won the $25,000 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut fiction. Angela Morales' "The Girls in My Town," about growing up Mexican-American in Los Angeles, was given the $10,000 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay.

Woman jailed for playing Ed Sheeran song loud and on repeat

An English judge handed down an eight-week jail sentence Monday to a woman who played an Ed Sheeran song at top volume and on repeat for an hour, according to multiple reports.

>> Read more trending news

Sonia Bryce, 36, played Sheeran’s “Shape of You” on repeat, despite complaints from her neighbors and their five children, The Telegraph reported.

“I used to like Ed Sheeran but I’ve taken him off my playlist,” neighbor Clare Tidmarsh told the newspaper. “It drove us crazy,"

As part of her defense, The Telegraph reported Bryce claimed “that she does not actually like Ed Sheeran that much.”

Bryce’s landlords, Walsall Housing Group Ltd, got a court order last year that barred the Walsall woman from “creating a nuisance or annoyance,” ITV News reported. She violated the injunction several times and was sentenced to six weeks in jail last December, according to the news station.

"You must learn that you should behave as a reasonable and responsible adult, and not make life for your neighbors the misery that you have," Judge Philip Gregory of Walsall County Court told Bryce on Monday, according to The Telegraph.

"Everybody is entitled to live in a degree of peace and quiet with the usual give and take of society, but you do not behave like a civilized person, and you have got to learn that you will," he said.

Family files lawsuit in Canadian filmmaker's Keys dive death

The family of a Canadian filmmaker and conservationist who died during a shark filming excursion off the Florida Keys filed a wrongful death lawsuit Tuesday.

Rob Stewart, 37, of Toronto, Canada, died in January off Islamorada, Florida, while filming a follow-up to his 2006 documentary "Sharkwater," which examined the impact of shark hunting on the ocean's ecosystem.

According to the lawsuit, Stewart and dive organizer Peter Sotis both surfaced at the same time with apparent breathing difficulties, but Stewart didn't make it back on board the dive boat. While others were treating Sotis, they allowed Stewart to slip away.

Stewart's submerged body was found three days later, about 300 feet from where he was last spotted on the surface, following a massive search involving the Coast Guard and several other agencies.

Stewart's death "was a preventable tragedy that was going to happen to someone," his family's attorney, Michael Haggard said in an email.

The family "hopes the legal action will push out and/or change the ways of all irresponsibly operating diving businesses and help keep attention on Stewart's mission of ocean conservation," he added.

Unspecified damages are being sought in the negligence lawsuit filed in Broward County, Florida, Circuit Court. It names as defendants Horizon Dive Adventures of Key Largo, Florida, Add Helium LLC of Fort Lauderdale, Florida and dive organizers Peter and Claudia Sotis, who operate Add Helium.

An attorney for Sotis did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment.

According to the lawsuit, the dive was taking place at the wreck of the Queen of Nassau in about 230 feet of water and about six miles from the Islamorada coast.

A grappling hook had been placed on the wreck that was attached to a surface buoy to mark the location of the dive. Stewart and Peter Sotis encountered difficulties when they went down a third time to remove the grappling hook.

Stewart, a wildlife photographer, also made a 2013 documentary, "Revolution" about environmental collapse.

_____

Follow Curt Anderson on Twitter: http://twitter.com/miamicurt

Family files lawsuit in Canadian filmmaker's Keys dive death

The family of a Canadian filmmaker and conservationist who died during a shark filming excursion off the Florida Keys filed a wrongful death lawsuit Tuesday.

Rob Stewart, 37, of Toronto, Canada, died in January off Islamorada, Florida, while filming a follow-up to his 2006 documentary "Sharkwater," which examined the impact of shark hunting on the ocean's ecosystem.

According to the lawsuit, Stewart and dive organizer Peter Sotis both surfaced at the same time with apparent breathing difficulties, but Stewart didn't make it back on board the dive boat. While others were treating Sotis, they allowed Stewart to slip away.

Stewart's submerged body was found three days later, about 300 feet from where he was last spotted on the surface, following a massive search involving the Coast Guard and several other agencies.

Stewart's death "was a preventable tragedy that was going to happen to someone," his family's attorney, Michael Haggard said in an email.

The family "hopes the legal action will push out and/or change the ways of all irresponsibly operating diving businesses and help keep attention on Stewart's mission of ocean conservation," he added.

Unspecified damages are being sought in the negligence lawsuit filed in Broward County, Florida, Circuit Court. It names as defendants Horizon Dive Adventures of Key Largo, Florida, Add Helium LLC of Fort Lauderdale, Florida and dive organizers Peter and Claudia Sotis, who operate Add Helium.

An attorney for Sotis did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment.

According to the lawsuit, the dive was taking place at the wreck of the Queen of Nassau in about 230 feet of water and about six miles from the Islamorada coast.

A grappling hook had been placed on the wreck that was attached to a surface buoy to mark the location of the dive. Stewart and Peter Sotis encountered difficulties when they went down a third time to remove the grappling hook.

Stewart, a wildlife photographer, also made a 2013 documentary, "Revolution" about environmental collapse.

_____

Follow Curt Anderson on Twitter: http://twitter.com/miamicurt

Canada Might Legalize Recreational Weed In 2018

It was one of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's most controversial promises.

Alec Baldwin 'stunned' at popularity of Trump impression

Alec Baldwin says he's "stunned" at the popularity of his impression of President Donald Trump on "Saturday Night Live."

Baldwin tells Vanity Fair that he took up "SNL" producer Lorne Michaels' offer to play the Republican billionaire after a planned movie role fell through. He says it's turned out to be an "incredible opportunity."

Baldwin says Kate McKinnon is "one of the three most talented people" he's worked with on the show. McKinnon has played Hillary Clinton, Trump aide Kellyanne Conway and Attorney General Jeff Sessions on "SNL" this season.

In an excerpt of a new memoir, Baldwin praises his former "30 Rock" co-star Tina Fey. He writes that working on Fey's NBC sitcom was the best job he's had or will ever have.

Henry Moore sculpture is returning to London's east end

Old Flo is on her way home.

The London borough of Tower Hamlets says in a statement Tuesday that the Henry Moore bronze that was the center of a heated legal dispute will be returning to the east London this fall. Tower Hamlets Mayor John Biggs says the sculpture will be placed at Cabot Square in Canary Wharf.

The cash-strapped council had threatened to sell the sculpture, "Draped Seated Woman," nicknamed old Flo. Another London borough claimed it was the rightful owner and sued. The case stalled the sale.

In the meantime, Biggs' predecessor, Lutfur Rahman, was removed from office after being convicted of electoral fraud. When Tower Hamlets won the court case, Biggs sought to have Old Flo return after being on loan to a northern England sculpture park.

World Video Game Hall of Fame names 2017 finalists

The World Video Game Hall of Fame's 2017 finalists span decades and electronic platforms, from the 1981 arcade classic "Donkey Kong" that launched Mario's plumbing career to the 2006 living room hit "Wii Sports," that made gamers out of grandparents.

The hall of fame at The Strong museum in Rochester said Tuesday that 12 video games are under consideration for induction in May. They also include: "Final Fantasy VII," ''Halo: Combat Evolved," ''Microsoft Windows Solitaire," ''Mortal Kombat," ''Myst," ''Pokemon Red and Green," ''Portal," ''Resident Evil," ''Street Fighter II" and "Tomb Raider."

The finalists were chosen from thousands of nominations from more than 100 countries, said museum officials, who will rely on an international committee of video game scholars and journalists to select the 2017 class. The winners will be inducted May 4.

"What they all have in common is their undeniable impact on the world of gaming and popular culture," said Jon-Paul Dyson, director of The Strong's International Center for the History of Electronic Games."

The hall of fame recognizes electronic games that have achieved icon status and geographical reach, and that have influenced game design or popular culture.

The class of 2017 will be the third group to go into the young hall, joining "DOOM," ''Grand Theft Auto III," ''The Legend of Zelda," ''The Oregon Trail," ''Pac-Man," ''Pong," ''The Sims," ''Sonic the Hedgehog," ''Space Invaders," Tetris, "World of Wardcraft," and "Super Mario Bros.," whose title character got his start in this year's "Donkey Kong" entry.

More about this year's finalists, according The Strong:

—"Donkey Kong" (1981): Helped to launch the career of game designer Shigeru Miyamoto and sold an estimated 132,000 arcade cabinets.

—"Final Fantasy VII" (1997): The Sony Playstation's second-most popular game introduced 3-D computer graphics and full motion video, selling more than 10 million units.

—"Halo: Combat Evolved" (2001): A launch game for Microsoft's Xbox system, the science-fiction game sold more than 6 million copies and inspired sequels, spin-offs, novels, comic books and action figures.

—"Microsoft Windows Solitaire" (1991): Based on a centuries-old card game, it has been installed on more than 1 billion home computers and other machines since debuting on Windows 3.0.

—"Mortal Kombat" (1992): The game's realistic violence was debated internationally and in Congress and was a factor in the 1994 creation of the Entertainment Software Rating Board.

—"Myst" (1993): The slow-paced, contemplative game harnessed early CD-ROM technology and became the best-selling computer game in the 1990s, selling 6 million copies.

—"Pokemon Red and Green" (1996): Since appearing on the Nintendo Game Boy, the Pokemon phenomenon has produced more than 260 million copies of its games, 21.5 billion trading cards, more than 800 television episodes and 17 movies.

—"Portal" (2007): The Game Developers Conference's 2008 Game of the Year was the breakout hit out of the four first-person shooter games it was packaged with, recognized for game mechanics that relied on portal physics.

—"Resident Evil" (1996): Among spin-offs of the survival horror game are movies that have grossed more than $1.2 billion worldwide, as well as themed restaurants and novels.

—"Street Fighter II" (1991): One of the top-selling arcade games ever helped spark an arcade renaissance in the 1990s and inspired numerous sequels.

—"Tomb Raider" (1996): Its female protagonist, Lara Croft, is the face of a franchise that has sold more than 58 million units worldwide, helped in part by actress Angelina Jolie's movie portrayal.

—"Wii Sports" (2006): Launched with the Nintendo Wii home video game system, its motion-control technology let gamers of any age serve a tennis ball or throw a left hook and helped push Wii console sales to more than 100 million.

The UK Just Released The 'Most Secure Coin In The World'

The new British pound coin has a bunch of security features — and one is secret.
200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >