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Milo Yiannopoulos, Larry Wilmore go head-to-head on 'Maher'

While conservative provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos insulted comics Lena Dunham, Leslie Jones, Amy Schumer and Sarah Silverman, his appearance on HBO's "Real Time with Bill Maher" was relatively tame — at least until the television cameras were turned off.

It was later, during an online-only "Overtime" segment of Maher's Friday night show, that two of Maher's three panelists hurled expletives at the Breitbart News senior editor.

Maher's booking of Yiannopoulos, author of the upcoming book "Dangerous," drew attention earlier this week when journalist Jeremy Scahill backed out of the show because of his "hateful diatribes." The conservative gadfly has become a lightning rod; his planned speech at the University of California, Berkeley, was cancelled earlier this month when protests erupted.

Maher, a free speech advocate, told Yiannopoulos that he thought he was "colossally wrong" on most issues, "but if I barred everyone from the show who I thought was colossally wrong, I would be talking to myself."

Yiannopoulos called Maher his "favorite liberal" and directed most of his ire at female comedians.

"Your side has gone insane," he said. "The Democrats are the party of Lena Dunham. These people are hideous, mental people. The more the American people see of Lena Dunham, the fewer votes the Democratic Party is going to get."

Responded Maher about the "Girls" creator: "Let's not pick on fellow HBO stars."

The Breitbart editor said Schumer and Silverman "used to be funny before they contracted feminism." After the subject was brought up by Maher, he renewed hostilities with Jones that had begun with his review of the "Ghostbusters" film. Yiannopoulos' Twitter account was suspended last year after a series of racially insensitive tweets were directed at Jones, who is black.

On Maher's show, he called Jones "barely literate."

Still, the interview segment featured few harsh exchanges with Maher, and Yiannopoulos was not included in a panel discussion that featured comedian Larry Wilmore, author and counterterrorism expert Malcolm Nance and U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston, a Georgia Republican. But online, Yiannopoulos joined the other three to answer questions from viewers.

That's when things got interesting.

The starting-off point was when Yiannopoulos defended his criticism of a transgender person and saying, without offering evidence, that transgender people were involved in a disproportionate number of sex crimes. Wilborn objected, saying that reminded him of the attitudes people directed at gays and blacks to demonize them in society. He noted that for a long time, homosexuality was considered a disorder.

"Maybe it is," said Yiannopoulos, who is gay.

"Maybe you are," Wilborn said, "But most homosexuals are not."

Nance observed that Yiannopoulos seemed confused about who and what he was. When Maher tried to referee, Yiannopoulos said that he always seemed to have "awful" people on the show, "who are so stupid."

That's when Wilmore exploded, telling Yiannopoulos to "go f--- yourself." Maher defended Nance, telling Yiannopoulos that "this guy has done things that allow you to" live.

When the oddity of an openly gay man being seen as a leader of the alt-right movement was pointed out, Yiannopoulos said that "the worst people on the far left and far right all hate me."

Retorted Wilmore: "I think you're leaving out a lot of people."

Nance added another expletive when the Breitbart editor said he had no problems with the issue of President Donald Trump and ties to Russian, profanely dismissing him because he was not an American. Yiannopoulos is British.

It stopped there. Kingston declined a chance to be the third panelist to swear at Yiannopoulos.

Milo Yiannopoulos, Larry Wilmore go head-to-head on 'Maher'

While conservative provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos insulted comics Lena Dunham, Leslie Jones, Amy Schumer and Sarah Silverman, his appearance on HBO's "Real Time with Bill Maher" was relatively tame — at least until the television cameras were turned off.

It was later, during an online-only "Overtime" segment of Maher's Friday night show, that two of Maher's three panelists hurled expletives at the Breitbart News senior editor.

Maher's booking of Yiannopoulos, author of the upcoming book "Dangerous," drew attention earlier this week when journalist Jeremy Scahill backed out of the show because of his "hateful diatribes." The conservative gadfly has become a lightning rod; his planned speech at the University of California, Berkeley, was cancelled earlier this month when protests erupted.

Maher, a free speech advocate, told Yiannopoulos that he thought he was "colossally wrong" on most issues, "but if I barred everyone from the show who I thought was colossally wrong, I would be talking to myself."

Yiannopoulos called Maher his "favorite liberal" and directed most of his ire at female comedians.

"Your side has gone insane," he said. "The Democrats are the party of Lena Dunham. These people are hideous, mental people. The more the American people see of Lena Dunham, the fewer votes the Democratic Party is going to get."

Responded Maher about the "Girls" creator: "Let's not pick on fellow HBO stars."

The Breitbart editor said Schumer and Silverman "used to be funny before they contracted feminism." After the subject was brought up by Maher, he renewed hostilities with Jones that had begun with his review of the "Ghostbusters" film. Yiannopoulos' Twitter account was suspended last year after a series of racially insensitive tweets were directed at Jones, who is black.

On Maher's show, he called Jones "barely literate."

Still, the interview segment featured few harsh exchanges with Maher, and Yiannopoulos was not included in a panel discussion that featured comedian Larry Wilmore, author and counterterrorism expert Malcolm Nance and U.S. Rep. Jack Kingston, a Georgia Republican. But online, Yiannopoulos joined the other three to answer questions from viewers.

That's when things got interesting.

The starting-off point was when Yiannopoulos defended his criticism of a transgender person and saying, without offering evidence, that transgender people were involved in a disproportionate number of sex crimes. Wilborn objected, saying that reminded him of the attitudes people directed at gays and blacks to demonize them in society. He noted that for a long time, homosexuality was considered a disorder.

"Maybe it is," said Yiannopoulos, who is gay.

"Maybe you are," Wilborn said, "But most homosexuals are not."

Nance observed that Yiannopoulos seemed confused about who and what he was. When Maher tried to referee, Yiannopoulos said that he always seemed to have "awful" people on the show, "who are so stupid."

That's when Wilmore exploded, telling Yiannopoulos to "go f--- yourself." Maher defended Nance, telling Yiannopoulos that "this guy has done things that allow you to" live.

When the oddity of an openly gay man being seen as a leader of the alt-right movement was pointed out, Yiannopoulos said that "the worst people on the far left and far right all hate me."

Retorted Wilmore: "I think you're leaving out a lot of people."

Nance added another expletive when the Breitbart editor said he had no problems with the issue of President Donald Trump and ties to Russian, profanely dismissing him because he was not an American. Yiannopoulos is British.

It stopped there. Kingston declined a chance to be the third panelist to swear at Yiannopoulos.

James Brown's 'Funky Drummer' Clyde Stubblefield dies at 73

Clyde Stubblefield, a drummer for James Brown who created one of the most widely sampled drum breaks ever, died Saturday. He was 73.

His wife, Jody Hannon, told The Associated Press that Stubblefield died of kidney failure at a Madison, Wisconsin, hospital around noon. He had been suffering from kidney disease for 10 years, and had been hospitalized for a few days, she said.

Stubblefield performed on several of Brown's classics in the 1960s and early 70s, including "Cold Sweat," ''Say It Loud — I'm Black and I'm Proud," ''I've Got the Feelin'," and the album "Sex Machine."

But he was best known for a short solo on Brown's 1970 single, "Funky Drummer." Rolling Stone magazine said it was sampled on over 1,000 songs and served as the backbeat for countless hip-hop tracks, including Public Enemy's "Fight the Power," Dr. Dre's "Let Me Ride," LL Cool J's "Mama Said Knock You Out" and Run-D.M.C.'s "Run's House." It even turned up on Ed Sheeran's "Shirtsleeves" and George Michael's "Freedom '90," the magazine said.

Hennon said Stubblefield saw "very little" in royalties and never expected them.

But Stubblefield was held in high esteem by his fellow musicians. When Prince got wind in 2000 that Stubblefield was deep in debt from a fight against bladder cancer, he personally paid $90,000 to cover his bills, she said. "Clyde was considered his favorite drummer," she added.

Stubblefield was "a very nice southern gentleman" from Chattanooga, Tennessee, but had lived in Madison, his wife's hometown, since the early 1970s, she said. He had long been a fixture on the local music scene.

"He played here one time with James Brown and just fell in love with it," Hannon said.

Services are pending.

James Brown's 'Funky Drummer' Clyde Stubblefield dies at 73

Clyde Stubblefield, a drummer for James Brown who created one of the most widely sampled drum breaks ever, died Saturday. He was 73.

His wife, Jody Hannon, told The Associated Press that Stubblefield died of kidney failure at a Madison, Wisconsin, hospital around noon. He had been suffering from kidney disease for 10 years, and had been hospitalized for a few days, she said.

Stubblefield performed on several of Brown's classics in the 1960s and early 70s, including "Cold Sweat," ''Say It Loud — I'm Black and I'm Proud," ''I've Got the Feelin'," and the album "Sex Machine."

But he was best known for a short solo on Brown's 1970 single, "Funky Drummer." Rolling Stone magazine said it was sampled on over 1,000 songs and served as the backbeat for countless hip-hop tracks, including Public Enemy's "Fight the Power," Dr. Dre's "Let Me Ride," LL Cool J's "Mama Said Knock You Out" and Run-D.M.C.'s "Run's House." It even turned up on Ed Sheeran's "Shirtsleeves" and George Michael's "Freedom '90," the magazine said.

Hennon said Stubblefield saw "very little" in royalties and never expected them.

But Stubblefield was held in high esteem by his fellow musicians. When Prince got wind in 2000 that Stubblefield was deep in debt from a fight against bladder cancer, he personally paid $90,000 to cover his bills, she said. "Clyde was considered his favorite drummer," she added.

Stubblefield was "a very nice southern gentleman" from Chattanooga, Tennessee, but had lived in Madison, his wife's hometown, since the early 1970s, she said. He had long been a fixture on the local music scene.

"He played here one time with James Brown and just fell in love with it," Hannon said.

Services are pending.

Hungarian film 'On Body and Soul' wins Golden Bear in Berlin

A Hungarian love story about two slaughterhouse workers who connect in shared dreams won the top award Saturday at this year's Berlin Film Festival.

"On Body and Soul" by writer-director Ildiko Enyedi contrasts the harsh reality of the abattoir with the magical world of slumber.

Enyedi was previously best known for her 1989 debut film, "My 20th Century," which won the Golden Camera award in Cannes that year.

The Golden Bear had been expected to go to the comedy "The Other Side of Hope," which instead earned veteran filmmaker Aki Kaurismaki a Silver Bear for best director. The film sees a young Syrian refugee befriending a grouchy Finn, with Kaurismaki's deadpan humor delivering poignant messages about the horrors of war and the current refugee crisis in Europe.

The jury award went to "Felicite," a film by French-Senegalese director Alain Gomis about a singer in a Congolese night club.

South Korea's Kim Min-hee received the best actress award for her role in "On the Beach at Night Alone," about a woman coming to terms with the end of an affair.

Georg Friedrich from Austria was named best actor for "Bright Nights," in which he portrays a father trying to reconnect with his teenage son.

"A Fantastic Woman" by Chilean director Sebastian Lelio received a Silver Bear for best screenplay, shared with Gonzalo Maza. It tells the tale of a transgender woman mourning for her dead lover even as most of those around her remain unwilling to empathize.

The jury also awarded Dana Bunescu a prize for outstanding artistic contribution for her editing of "Ana, mon amour," about a Romanian couple struggling to make their relationship work despite mental illness.

A final Silver Bear award for features that "open new perspective" went to movie "Spoor," a murder mystery set in rural Poland.

Hungarian film 'On Body and Soul' wins Golden Bear in Berlin

A Hungarian love story about two slaughterhouse workers who connect in shared dreams won the top award Saturday at this year's Berlin Film Festival.

"On Body and Soul" by writer-director Ildiko Enyedi contrasts the harsh reality of the abattoir with the magical world of slumber.

Enyedi was previously best known for her 1989 debut film, "My 20th Century," which won the Golden Camera award in Cannes that year.

The Golden Bear had been expected to go to the comedy "The Other Side of Hope," which instead earned veteran filmmaker Aki Kaurismaki a Silver Bear for best director. The film sees a young Syrian refugee befriending a grouchy Finn, with Kaurismaki's deadpan humor delivering poignant messages about the horrors of war and the current refugee crisis in Europe.

The jury award went to "Felicite," a film by French-Senegalese director Alain Gomis about a singer in a Congolese night club.

South Korea's Kim Min-hee received the best actress award for her role in "On the Beach at Night Alone," about a woman coming to terms with the end of an affair.

Georg Friedrich from Austria was named best actor for "Bright Nights," in which he portrays a father trying to reconnect with his teenage son.

"A Fantastic Woman" by Chilean director Sebastian Lelio received a Silver Bear for best screenplay, shared with Gonzalo Maza. It tells the tale of a transgender woman mourning for her dead lover even as most of those around her remain unwilling to empathize.

The jury also awarded Dana Bunescu a prize for outstanding artistic contribution for her editing of "Ana, mon amour," about a Romanian couple struggling to make their relationship work despite mental illness.

A final Silver Bear award for features that "open new perspective" went to movie "Spoor," a murder mystery set in rural Poland.

Lisa Marie Presley says she's broke after ex asks for money

Lisa Marie Presley describes herself as deeply in debt and just out of a treatment facility in court papers that accuse her estranged fourth husband of having hundreds of inappropriate photographs of children on his computer.

Their 8-year-old twin daughters are under the care of California child protective services, according to documents filed this month with California Superior Court in Los Angeles related to husband Michael Lockwood's request for spousal support. Lockwood has not been charged with anything and his lawyer said the accusations are inaccurate.

The court papers tell a tale of profligacy and alleged fraud that has made things messy for Presley, the 49-year-old only child of Elvis Presley and ex-wife of both Michael Jackson and Nicolas Cage.

It's not clear why Presley's daughters are in state custody; her lawyer did not immediately return a call for comment Saturday. Presley said in court papers that she has lived with her adult daughter and has been in a treatment facility for undisclosed reasons since moving from Tennessee to California last year. She and Lockwood separated in June after 10 years of marriage.

Presley said there is a children's court trial scheduled for March related to her discovery of photos and "disturbing" video on her husband's computer.

"I was shocked and horrified and sick to my stomach," she wrote in court papers.

Lockwood's lawyer, Jeff Sturman, said Saturday his client denied the "highly sensational" and "inaccurate" charges.

In court papers, Lockwood called it distasteful that Presley "has placed more value on trying to damage my reputation than on the fact that her false statements may be brought to our daughters' attention, thereby causing them to suffer public humiliation, embarrassment and emotional distress."

Lockwood wants the court to order Presley to pay him $40,000 a month in spousal support and $100,000 in attorneys' fees. He's a musician who said he essentially gave up his career to work with his wife, who's a singer-songwriter.

Presley disclosed that she gets a $100,000 monthly inheritance check and is paid $4,300 a month and gets health insurance through her father's estate. She also has a 15 percent stake in Elvis Presley Enterprises that is held in a trust; Elvis' estate earns millions of dollars a year.

Yet Presley, who said her funds were mishandled by a business manager, says she owes millions of dollars in back taxes and credit card bills. She said she owns a home in England that's worth less than what she owes on it, and has made no money as a musician herself. She said she lives rent-free with her daughter and pays for two full-time nannies for her twins.

"I cannot recall the last time I spent money on clothes and shoes of any value," she told the court.

She said her estranged husband spent more than $1 million on her credit cards that she didn't authorize; he denies it. Lockwood contends Presley has more money than she's letting on and that her insistence that he work only for her essentially destroyed his career.

His wife, he said, "has great difficulty being honest and she rarely, if ever, accepts personal responsibility for her own wrongdoing," he said.

A hearing has been scheduled on the case for Feb. 22.

Old farmstead's history runs from John Brown to James Brown

From John Brown's raid to James Brown's wail, a stream of hot-blooded American history runs through a 19th-century farmstead in the Appalachian foothills of western Maryland.

The John Brown connection is well known. The restored log farmhouse near Dargan is where the abolitionist launched his ill-fated, 1859 seizure of a federal armory in nearby Harpers Ferry, West Virginia.

Historians cite the failed attempt by Brown and a band of fervent followers to raid the federal arsenal as the opening salvo in the Civil War because it incited strong passions, especially in the slave-holding South. The farmhouse was designated a national historic landmark in 1973.

But the John Brown plaque and roadside marker 75 miles west of Baltimore don't mention the dazzling array of black entertainers who performed on the same site a century later, during the racially segregated 1950s and early '60s. James Brown, Ray Charles, Chubby Checker, Etta James, Otis Redding and dozens of others headlined at John Brown's Farm, a stop on the so-called Chitlin' Circuit before white audiences embraced rhythm-and-blues and soul music.

The now dilapidated concrete-block dance hall was built by an African-American fraternal organization, the Improved Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of the World — also known as the Black Elks — who bought the 235-acre property in 1950 for a retreat memorializing John Brown. The site's history is documented in a new book, "From John Brown to James Brown: The Little Farm Where Liberty Budded, Blossomed and Boogied."

"I think it should be considered the No. 1 black history site in the United States," said Ed Maliskas, author of the self-published volume.

Maliskas, a historian, musician and retired evangelical pastor, spent nearly eight years researching and writing the book after hearing about the R&B connection in a casual conversation in 2008, shortly after moving from Miami to Hagerstown.

His interview subjects included Al Baylor, 78, of Bunker Hill, West Virginia, who remembers donning a suitcoat and tie to dance to Frankie Lyman, Ike and Tina Turner and B.B. King.

"Anybody that was anybody came to John Brown's Farm," Baylor told The Associated Press in a telephone interview. "I was in hog heaven."

Young black people from bordering states, Baltimore and Washington, D.C., met at the farm, said Hagerstown native Reginald Johnson, 74, who now lives in Rochester, New York.

"The people showed up on the weekend. That was our gathering place," Johnson told the AP. He remembers paying $2 to attend dances that Maliskas said drew 400 to 500 people despite the farm's remote location down winding, country roads in a valley known as Frog Hollow.

The shows were part of the Black Elks' plan for creating a national shrine at the site for annual membership meetings, said the group's unofficial historian, Peggy Coplin of Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania. The organization — itself a product of racial segregation — built the auditorium, two cottages and a stone entrance arch before financial constraints and convenience prompted a move to Winton, North Carolina, now the group's national headquarters. The Elks sold the Maryland property in 1966, seven months after James Brown starred in the last show, on Labor Day weekend 1965, Maliskas writes.

Coplin told the AP in a telephone interview that the group would like to see the site's Black Elks history promoted, but the organization has no money for it. Membership has fallen to about 250,000 from a mid-century peak of 450,000, she said.

Both the farmhouse, known as the Kennedy Farm, and the dance hall are now owned by South Lynn, a Washington-area wood-flooring contractor, and his son and business partner South Lynn Jr., who share an interest in history.

The younger Lynn told the AP in a telephone interview that he put a new roof on the auditorium last summer but the building needs much more work. Through the broken window of a peeling red door, one can see stacks of flooring materials that the Lynns are storing there.

"I think it would be great to promote it," Lynn said, "if Maryland's into it."

Neither the Maryland Historical Trust nor the National Park Service, which helped restore the farmhouse, are aware of any publicly funded efforts to preserve or promote the dance hall, officials of those organizations said. But the nonprofit group Preservation Maryland hopes the state will at least provide funds to further document the building, which reportedly also served as a gay nightclub or disco in the 1970s, Executive Director Nicholas Redding said.

"It's just another layer of history we need to add to these places," Redding said. "From a preservation standpoint, it's just about telling a richer and more comprehensive story about our state, which is, I think, a positive thing for everyone."

Wrestler Ivan Koloff, known as 'The Russian Bear,' dies at 74

World Wrestling Entertainment star Ivan Koloff has died at the age of 74.WWE announced the news on Twitter.

>> Read more trending stories

BREAKING: WWE is saddened to learn that Ivan Koloff has passed away at age 74. https://t.co/gs9l0W0Jxo pic.twitter.com/Dd1QbMzs9V— WWE (@WWE) February 18, 2017

Koloff, nicknamed "The Russian Bear," was a rival of star wrestler Bruno Sammartino, and the two had many memorable moments in the ring.Koloff suffered from liver disease, according to his daughter, Rachel Marley. She started a GoFundMe page to raise funds for medical expenses and encourage fans to send cards and prayers.Hulk Hogan posted his condolences on Twitter, saying that it had been a rough week for the wrestling community. George "The Animal" Steele and Chavo Guerrero Sr. also died recently.

RIP Ivan Koloff,it's been a tough week,Chavo,Nicole Bass,George Steel,Ivan and Marty Prince,I would feel helpless if not for my faith1loveHH— Hulk Hogan (@HulkHogan) February 18, 2017 <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

Texas judge allows lawsuit against Selena widower to proceed

A Texas judge says a lawsuit against the widower of slain Tejano star Selena can proceed as her father seeks to block a TV series about her.

Selena's father, Abraham Quintanilla, opposes the show. It's based on what he calls an unauthorized book, "To Selena With Love," by Selena's husband, Chris Perez.

Lawyers for Perez wanted the lawsuit dismissed based on free speech grounds. They had no immediate comment on Friday's ruling.

Quintanilla is suing Perez and two companies planning to adapt the widower's memoir into a series. The lawsuit says that after Selena's 1995 slaying, Perez signed a deal that gave all rights to Selena's likeness and name to her estate.

Selena Quintanilla-Perez was shot by her fan club president, now serving life in prison.

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