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Scientists Are Growing Working Eyes Where Eyes Shouldn't Grow

The researchers have also made six-legged frogs and two-headed worms.

Evil Elsa? 'Frozen' producer reveals film's original ending

"Frozen" producer Peter Del Vecho tells Entertainment Weekly the original version of the film was more in line with the Hans Christian Andersen tale on which it's based. Del Vecho says princess sisters Anna and Elsa weren't related in early scripts. He says "Elsa was a self-proclaimed Snow Queen, but she was a villain and pure evil."

The drafts included a finale with Elsa using her powers to save the kingdom, but Del Vecho says the character's evilness gave them "no emotional connection" to her. The filmmakers finally got things right after reworking the script.

A sequel to the film is in production.

Evil Elsa? 'Frozen' producer reveals film's original ending

"Frozen" producer Peter Del Vecho tells Entertainment Weekly the original version of the film was more in line with the Hans Christian Andersen tale on which it's based. Del Vecho says princess sisters Anna and Elsa weren't related in early scripts. He says "Elsa was a self-proclaimed Snow Queen, but she was a villain and pure evil."

The drafts included a finale with Elsa using her powers to save the kingdom, but Del Vecho says the character's evilness gave them "no emotional connection" to her. The filmmakers finally got things right after reworking the script.

A sequel to the film is in production.

Ed Sheeran, Justin Timberlake, Paris Jackson & Zac Efron

So what did Ed Sheeran have to say about the baby-look-a-like who became a viral sensation?! 

"She's not mine! She's not mine! It's mad the kind of things that go viral."

He went on to say that he would definitely love to have kids at some point, but not just yet, since he wouldn't want to be touring while being a father. E! Online 

Justin Timberlake just posted a photo with Timbaland and Pharrell, so now the world is buzzing about a possible collaboration!

Paris Jackson told Jimmy Fallon that she went to see High School Musical in concert when she was a kid, but left disappointed because Zac Efron wasn't there. Apparently, he was off filming a movie at the time. She said:

"That was, like, the most depressing part about it, He wasn’t there, and I was, like, this heartbroken 10-year-old."

Well, Zac heard the news and has responded by apologizing to Paris for breaking her heart and has invited her to the premiere of his movie BaywatchTeen Vogue

Figure skater Michelle Kwan's husband, Clay Pell, just filed for divorce. He said:

"It is with deep regret that I share that Michelle and my marriage is coming to an end. This is a sad and difficult turn of events for our family. I love Michelle, and wish her the very best as her life takes her in a new direction. I want to thank friends and family who have given wisdom and support, and I ask for privacy during this challenging time."

Michelle and Clay were married for four years and have 2 children. E! Online 

Report: FBI recovers Rockwell painting taken in 1976

The FBI has reportedly recovered a 1919 Norman Rockwell painting stolen more than 40 years ago from a New Jersey home.

The painting, sometimes called "Lazybones" or "Boy Asleep with Hoe," graced the cover of the Sept. 6, 1919, edition of the Saturday Evening Post. The oil-on-canvas piece was among several items taken during a 1976 break-in in Cherry Hill, a Philadelphia suburb.

Susan Murta tells The Philadelphia Inquirer (http://bit.ly/2nONreH ) the FBI did a great job. She last saw the painting in her parents' home in 1976. Her parents are deceased.

An Inquirer story last year said the owner forked over $75 for it after accidentally damaging the painting with a pool cue in 1954. It's now believed worth more than $1 million.

It's not clear how the painting was recovered.

___

Information from: The Philadelphia Inquirer, http://www.inquirer.com

Report: FBI recovers Rockwell painting taken in 1976

The FBI has reportedly recovered a 1919 Norman Rockwell painting stolen more than 40 years ago from a New Jersey home.

The painting, sometimes called "Lazybones" or "Boy Asleep with Hoe," graced the cover of the Sept. 6, 1919, edition of the Saturday Evening Post. The oil-on-canvas piece was among several items taken during a 1976 break-in in Cherry Hill, a Philadelphia suburb.

Susan Murta tells The Philadelphia Inquirer (http://bit.ly/2nONreH ) the FBI did a great job. She last saw the painting in her parents' home in 1976. Her parents are deceased.

An Inquirer story last year said the owner forked over $75 for it after accidentally damaging the painting with a pool cue in 1954. It's now believed worth more than $1 million.

It's not clear how the painting was recovered.

___

Information from: The Philadelphia Inquirer, http://www.inquirer.com

'Happy Endings' star Adam Pally arrested on drug charges

Actor Adam Pally has been arrested and charged with possession of cocaine and marijuana in New York.

New York City police spokesman Thomas Antonetti tells The Associated Press that Pally was arrested late Tuesday night in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of Manhattan. He faces a criminal possession charge for the cocaine and a possession of marijuana count. A court date is set for June. Pally's representative didn't immediately return a request for comment Thursday.

Pally is best known for his role as Max Blum in the short-running ABC sitcom "Happy Endings." He also plays Dr. Peter Prentice on Hulu's "The Mindy Project" and stars in "Making History" on Fox.

First Afghan women's orchestra tries to change attitudes

Afghanistan's first — and only — all-female symphony is trying to change attitudes in a deeply conservative country where many see music as immoral, especially for women.

The symphony's two conductors show how difficult that can be, but also how satisfying success is.

One of them, Negin Khpolwak, was supported by her father when she joined the Afghanistan National Institute of Music and then became part of its girls' orchestra, called Zohra. But the rest of her family was deeply against it. Her uncles cut off ties with her father.

"They told him he is not their brother anymore," said Khpolwak, now 20. "Even my grand-mother disowned my father."

Khwolpak had learned about the music institute at the orphanage in Kabul where she spent most of her life. Her father sent her to the orphanage because he was afraid for her safety in their home province of Kunar in eastern Afghanistan, an area where Taliban militants are active.

The institute is one of the only schools in Afghanistan where girls and boys share classrooms, and it draws its students from the ranks of orphanages and street children, giving them a chance at a new life. Khpolwak studied piano and drums before becoming the orchestra's conductor.

More than 30 girls aged 12 to 20 play in Zohra, which is named after a goddess of music in Persian literature. In January, the orchestra, which performs traditional Afghan and Western Classical music, had its first international tour, appearing at the World Economic Forum in Davos and four other cities in Switzerland and Germany.

"The formation of the orchestra is aimed at sending a positive message to the community, to send a positive message to the girls, to encourage families and girls to join the music scene of the country," said Ahmad Naser Sarmast, the institute's founder and director.

Sarmast has experienced firsthand the militants' hatred of music. In 2014, a Taliban suicide bomber blew himself up at a concert Sarmast was attending. He was wounded and a German man in the audience died.

The Zohra orchestra was created in 2014 when one of the institute's students, a girl named Meena, asked Sarmast if there could be a group where girls could play together. Sarmast leaped at the idea.

Since then, Meena has disappeared. Last year, the 7th grader told the school she had to attend her sister's wedding in her family's village in eastern Nangarhar province. She never returned, a sign of how tenuous people's situation is in a country where war rages, communications are poor and poverty is rife. Sarmast said the school has not been in contact with her, but he's hopeful she'll return to the school and Zohra.

The orchestra's other conductor, 18-year-old Zarifa Adiba, faced resistance from her family just as Khpolwak did.

When she joined the school in 2014, she only told her mother and step-father, not her four brothers and her uncles, because she knew they would disapprove. Her mother and step-father tried to tell them about the importance of music — without mentioning Adiba — but they weren't convinced.

"If my brothers and uncles had known about me learning or playing music, they 100 percent would have stopped me because they had a very negative view toward music," Adiba said.

Her family's opposition to music was so intense she hesitated to join the orchestra's trip to Davos. But she ended up going, and as one of the conductors she was widely interviewed in the media there and appeared on TV.

When she returned, her uncles were the first to congratulate her. Two of her brothers are still not happy about her involvement with music but now she has the support of the rest of the family, she has more courage, and she said she is sure her brothers will eventually come around.

"I changed my family, now it is time for other girls to change their families because I am sure that slowly all Afghanistan will change," she said.

First Afghan women's orchestra tries to change attitudes

Afghanistan's first — and only — all-female symphony is trying to change attitudes in a deeply conservative country where many see music as immoral, especially for women.

The symphony's two conductors show how difficult that can be, but also how satisfying success is.

One of them, Negin Khpolwak, was supported by her father when she joined the Afghanistan National Institute of Music and then became part of its girls' orchestra, called Zohra. But the rest of her family was deeply against it. Her uncles cut off ties with her father.

"They told him he is not their brother anymore," said Khpolwak, now 20. "Even my grand-mother disowned my father."

Khwolpak had learned about the music institute at the orphanage in Kabul where she spent most of her life. Her father sent her to the orphanage because he was afraid for her safety in their home province of Kunar in eastern Afghanistan, an area where Taliban militants are active.

The institute is one of the only schools in Afghanistan where girls and boys share classrooms, and it draws its students from the ranks of orphanages and street children, giving them a chance at a new life. Khpolwak studied piano and drums before becoming the orchestra's conductor.

More than 30 girls aged 12 to 20 play in Zohra, which is named after a goddess of music in Persian literature. In January, the orchestra, which performs traditional Afghan and Western Classical music, had its first international tour, appearing at the World Economic Forum in Davos and four other cities in Switzerland and Germany.

"The formation of the orchestra is aimed at sending a positive message to the community, to send a positive message to the girls, to encourage families and girls to join the music scene of the country," said Ahmad Naser Sarmast, the institute's founder and director.

Sarmast has experienced firsthand the militants' hatred of music. In 2014, a Taliban suicide bomber blew himself up at a concert Sarmast was attending. He was wounded and a German man in the audience died.

The Zohra orchestra was created in 2014 when one of the institute's students, a girl named Meena, asked Sarmast if there could be a group where girls could play together. Sarmast leaped at the idea.

Since then, Meena has disappeared. Last year, the 7th grader told the school she had to attend her sister's wedding in her family's village in eastern Nangarhar province. She never returned, a sign of how tenuous people's situation is in a country where war rages, communications are poor and poverty is rife. Sarmast said the school has not been in contact with her, but he's hopeful she'll return to the school and Zohra.

The orchestra's other conductor, 18-year-old Zarifa Adiba, faced resistance from her family just as Khpolwak did.

When she joined the school in 2014, she only told her mother and step-father, not her four brothers and her uncles, because she knew they would disapprove. Her mother and step-father tried to tell them about the importance of music — without mentioning Adiba — but they weren't convinced.

"If my brothers and uncles had known about me learning or playing music, they 100 percent would have stopped me because they had a very negative view toward music," Adiba said.

Her family's opposition to music was so intense she hesitated to join the orchestra's trip to Davos. But she ended up going, and as one of the conductors she was widely interviewed in the media there and appeared on TV.

When she returned, her uncles were the first to congratulate her. Two of her brothers are still not happy about her involvement with music but now she has the support of the rest of the family, she has more courage, and she said she is sure her brothers will eventually come around.

"I changed my family, now it is time for other girls to change their families because I am sure that slowly all Afghanistan will change," she said.

Leonardo DiCaprio, Q-Tip bro it up at intimate showcase

Longtime friends Leonardo DiCaprio and Q-Tip hung out at an intimate showcase for an Australian band making its New York City debut late Wednesday.

The Oscar-winning actor and Grammy-winning rapper were in the small audience at Ludlow House as trio Chase Atlantic performed songs in a stripped, raw form.

DiCaprio bobbed his head from his plush chair while sitting next to Sports Illustrated Swimsuit model Nina Agdal and chatting with the leader of A Tribe Called Quest.

Q-Tip went to the stage to watch when the band asked people to come closer, as DiCaprio, in a fedora, sat back. The audience included music industry insiders, record label players and some press.

Chase Atlantic performed songs from its three-song project released in January, "Part One," as well as tracks from another three-song album, "Part Two," to be released Friday.

The group's genre-bending sounds echo The Weeknd and The 1975. Band members include brothers Clinton Cave and Mitchel Cave, and Christian Anthony.

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